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Teaching Academic Content and Language Proficiency: SIOP for Nonnative English Speaking Faculty Kim H. Teaching Academic Content and Language Proficiency: SIOP for Nonnative English Speaking Faculty Kim H. Song, Ed. D. Associate Professor TESOL & Social Studies Methods University of Missouri – St. Louis [email protected] edu August 11 -12, 2010

A broader view of methods Schools are not buildings, curriculum, timetables and meetings. Schools A broader view of methods Schools are not buildings, curriculum, timetables and meetings. Schools are relationships and interactions among people. David and Roger Johnson (1989)

Too often we give students answers to remember rather than problems to solve. Roger Too often we give students answers to remember rather than problems to solve. Roger Lewis

August 11: Overview of SIOP and Backward Assessment • Effective teacher traits – 3 August 11: Overview of SIOP and Backward Assessment • Effective teacher traits – 3 H’s • 2 Concerns about teaching content in English; • Hybrid instructional framework; • Introduction to the 8 SIOP components;

Effective Teacher Traits in a Linguistically and Culturally Diverse Society • 3 ‘H’ Traits Effective Teacher Traits in a Linguistically and Culturally Diverse Society • 3 ‘H’ Traits – Head – Heart – Hands

The “Head”: What is your content competence? Intellectual Capability The “Head”: What is your content competence? Intellectual Capability

The Heart You’re here, aren’t you? Are your students HERE, too? Do they trust The Heart You’re here, aren’t you? Are your students HERE, too? Do they trust you? Do you trust your students? Do you show your Confidence?

The “Hand”: Effective implementation ‘hands -on’ strategies The “Hand”: Effective implementation ‘hands -on’ strategies

2 Concerns Assuming you know your CONTENT, there are mainly two concerns when nonnative 2 Concerns Assuming you know your CONTENT, there are mainly two concerns when nonnative professors teach content using English as a communication medium; 1. English Proficiency Levels of Professors 2. Instructional Strategies http: //www. youtube. com/watch? v=1 k 8 ae. DUC 9 XQ

Oral proficiency levels • What levels of English proficiency do Korean professors need to Oral proficiency levels • What levels of English proficiency do Korean professors need to deliver the content in depth or as expected? • Novice, Intermediate, Advanced, and/or Superior? Please rate the proficiency levels of each person.

Novice, Intermediate, Advanced or Superior? Case 1. Sujin knows enough English to speak simply, Novice, Intermediate, Advanced or Superior? Case 1. Sujin knows enough English to speak simply, with some circumlocution, in casual conversations about concrete topics, such as her own background, her family, her interests at school, her travels, and various current events. She can express facts, give instructions, describe, and narrate in past, present, and future time. She handles elementary constructions with most of the time but still makes patterned errors, especially when trying to express an opinion or support her point of view.

Novice, Intermediate, Advanced or Superior? Case 2. Samshik has no practical speaking ability in Novice, Intermediate, Advanced or Superior? Case 2. Samshik has no practical speaking ability in English, although he does know a few isolated words and expressions. He can name the days of the week and the months of the year, name a few basic objects and colors, and use a few memorized expressions, such as “Hello, ” “How are you? ” and “Goodbye. ” However, he really can’t use what he knows, even in a very simple conversation. Native speakers have a very difficult time understanding him because of his heavy Korean accent.

Novice, Intermediate, Advanced or Superior? Case 3. Jaesok can converse in both formal and Novice, Intermediate, Advanced or Superior? Case 3. Jaesok can converse in both formal and informal situations, resolve problems, deal with unfamiliar topics, describe in detail, and offer supported opinion in English. He is quite adept at talking about his special field of competence – political science – and is generally able to handle any topic of discussion he can handle in English. He has a slight accent and occasionally makes errors, but they never interfere with communication or disturb speakers.

Novice, Intermediate, Advanced or Superior? Case 4. Jiyeon knows enough English to cope with Novice, Intermediate, Advanced or Superior? Case 4. Jiyeon knows enough English to cope with routine, daily situations in English-speaking environment. She can create with the language, ask and answer questions, and participate in conversations dealing with everyday topics as well as those related to her job. Most native speakers and some foreigners understand what she is saying even though she makes errors in pronunciation. She can handle requests for services, like renting a room or ordering a meal. She can also handle her profession, a tour guide, very well. She explains the history of the tourist sites and attraction, and the visitors including the foreigners understand her well.

Novice, Intermediate, Advanced or Superior? What is your oral proficiency level? Evaluate your oral Novice, Intermediate, Advanced or Superior? What is your oral proficiency level? Evaluate your oral proficiency using the oral fluency assessment criteria (handout 14), and write strong areas and weak areas to improve. Share it with your partner! International Englishe. S vs Korean English!

Instructional Strategies of Effective University Professors? How well are you prepared? Do you know Instructional Strategies of Effective University Professors? How well are you prepared? Do you know how and what to prepare for your classes? Kim’s syllabus for her class, TCH ED 6230 Kim’s course page at Blackboard: http: //mygateway. umsl. edu

Good Practice in University Teaching • encourages contact between students and faculty, • develops Good Practice in University Teaching • encourages contact between students and faculty, • develops reciprocity and cooperation among students with explicit academic and social goals, • encourages active learning and problem solving, • gives prompt feedback, • emphasizes time on task, • communicates high expectations, and • respects diverse talents and ways of learning.

Who are you? Who are your students? How do they learn? • Who are Who are you? Who are your students? How do they learn? • Who are your students in the 21 st Century – vision of today’s students • http: //www. youtube. com/watch? v=d. GCJ 46 vy R 9 o • Teaching Tips for University Faculty Development: http: //honolulu. hawaii. edu/intranet/committees/Fac. Dev. Com/g uidebk/teachtip. htm

Hybrid Instructional Framework • 4 -Step Backward Teaching and Learning cycle Step 1: Exploration/Preinstruction, Hybrid Instructional Framework • 4 -Step Backward Teaching and Learning cycle Step 1: Exploration/Preinstruction, Step 2: Assessment Development Step 3: Instruction/Presentation, & Step 4: Expansion: Assessment • Reflective Thinking Development – scaffolding schema 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Context Setting Identification, Frame and Reframe of Problems Possible Solution Experimentation Evaluation SIOP (Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol)

SIOP Time! Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP) SIOP Time! Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP)

Foundation of SIOP • Krashen’s 5 Hypotheses (Natural Approach, Krashen, 1989) http: //education. csm. Foundation of SIOP • Krashen’s 5 Hypotheses (Natural Approach, Krashen, 1989) http: //education. csm. edu/students/abolen/stephen_krashen's_5_hypotheses. ht m 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) • Acquisition vs Learning Hyp. Natural Order Hyp. Comprehensible Input Hyp. – I +1 Monitor Hyp. – self-correct Affective Filter Hyp. Cummins (2000)’s contextual and meaningful approach in acquiring the target language using L 1 competence.

Foundation of SIOP • Based on effective teaching theories and methods in TESOL, a Foundation of SIOP • Based on effective teaching theories and methods in TESOL, a few scholars started creating a framework to help teachers teach ELLs in the two areas, English language and content learning, in 1997. • It took three to four years to come up with a sheltered instructional observation protocol (SIOP) as a best teaching practice framework (Echevarria & Short, 2004; Echevarria, Vogt, & Short, 2006).

Best Teaching Practice: SIOP (Short, 2009) A Conscious, Purposeful and Intentional Instructional Design • Best Teaching Practice: SIOP (Short, 2009) A Conscious, Purposeful and Intentional Instructional Design • The SIOP is not a step-by-step approach, but rather a framework for organizing best practices. • The central feature of the SIOP Model is the inclusion of content and language objectives for every lesson. • SIOP helps English teachers incorporate Reading, Listening, Speaking, &Writing in their classes in an explicit way!

SIOP Training and Coaching Procedure 1. SIOP training on 8 components and 30 features SIOP Training and Coaching Procedure 1. SIOP training on 8 components and 30 features (It takes about two years. ); 2. One-on-one coaching between the SIOP training 1. 2. 3. Preconference with a coach and a faculty (context setting, LO/CO, solution, problem reframing); Observation and/or videotaping the teaching (experimentation, self-assessment, solution); Postconference with a coach and a faculty (reflection, self-assess, expansion, new schema, problem reframing);

SIOP Overview: 8 Components Scaffolding by physical movement & modeling 1. Lesson Preparation 2. SIOP Overview: 8 Components Scaffolding by physical movement & modeling 1. Lesson Preparation 2. Building Background 3. Comprehensible Input 4. Strategies 5. Interaction 6. Practice/Application 7. Lesson Delivery, and 8. Review/Assessment http: //www. youtube. com/watch? v=ne 7 f. Ppx. Anu M

What are the 8 Components? Quick Review & Assessment 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. What are the 8 Components? Quick Review & Assessment 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Lesson P_____ Building ____ C______ I____ S_________ P_____ & _____ Lesson _______ & A______

Assignment for August 12: Mini-lessons • Choose one concept and/or academic vocabulary for a Assignment for August 12: Mini-lessons • Choose one concept and/or academic vocabulary for a mini-lesson; • Write one language objective and one content objective; Please use action verbs you can measure. • Write the assessment plan (objective tests, and/or assessment scoring rubrics). Please use a handout if needed. You will be teaching this mini-lesson tomorrow!

Exit Slip • Content Objectives – AWBAT define 3 ‘H’s’ in their own words Exit Slip • Content Objectives – AWBAT define 3 ‘H’s’ in their own words using at least one example; – AWBAT describe 3 models used in a hybrid instructional framework – Identify 8 components of SIOP • Language Objectives – Share with a partner about the strength and the weakness of their 3 H’s; – Write a procedure of SIOP coaching and share the understanding of it.

August 12: SIOP Components 1&8 • Component 1, Lesson Preparation, and Component 8, Review August 12: SIOP Components 1&8 • Component 1, Lesson Preparation, and Component 8, Review and Assess • Significance of language objectives and content objectives • Sample lessons using SIOP component 1 and 8; • Analysis of the teaching scenarios on Lesson Preparation; • http: //www. youtube. com/watch? v=d. GCJ 46 vy. R 9 o

Let’s review SIOP Components: Sentence Fillers/Cloze The SIOP has ( ) components. They are: Let’s review SIOP Components: Sentence Fillers/Cloze The SIOP has ( ) components. They are: 1) LP ( ) 2) BB ( ) 3) CI ( ) 4) S ( )___ 5) ( )____ 6) P & A ( ) 7) LD ( ) and 8) ( )_& ( ) ___.

SIOP Objectives A. Content Objectives: 1. Identify 8 SIOP components and define SIOP in SIOP Objectives A. Content Objectives: 1. Identify 8 SIOP components and define SIOP in your own words; 2. Identify 6 features of the component 1; 3. Analyze the teaching scenario using the 6 features; B. Language Objectives: 4. Present a mini-lesson using one LO and one CO with the assessment plan; 5. Evaluate the teaching scenario of SIOP components, especially Component 1, lesson preparation, and Component 8, review and assess, with your group members. 6. Write and share at least two instructional strategies you have acquired through this workshop.

SIOP Component 1, Lesson Prep. and its 6 Features (LCCSMA) Lesson Preparation 1. CO SIOP Component 1, Lesson Prep. and its 6 Features (LCCSMA) Lesson Preparation 1. CO 2. LO 3. Content Concepts 4. Supplementary Materials 5. Meaningful Activities 6. Content Adaption

Review Lesson Objectives 27. Key Voc 28. Key Content Concept Assess Lesson Objectives 29. Review Lesson Objectives 27. Key Voc 28. Key Content Concept Assess Lesson Objectives 29. Regular Feedback on S Output Comp. 8: Review & Assess 30. Assess St’s Com of Obj.

SIOP Component 1, Lesson Prep. and its 6 Features (LCCSMA) Lesson Preparation 1. CO SIOP Component 1, Lesson Prep. and its 6 Features (LCCSMA) Lesson Preparation 1. CO 2. LO 3. Content Concepts 4. Supplementary Materials 5. Meaningful Activities 6. Content Adaption

Component 1: Lesson Preparation 1. — Clearly defined content objectives for students 2. — Component 1: Lesson Preparation 1. — Clearly defined content objectives for students 2. — Clearly defined language objectives 3. — Content concepts appropriate for age and educational background level of students 4. — Supplementary materials used to a high degree, making the lesson clear and meaningful 5. — Meaningful activities that integrate lesson concepts (e. g. , simulations, constructing models) with language practice opportunities for reading, writing, listening, and/or speaking 6. — Adaptation of content to all levels of student proficiency

Comp. 1 – 6 Features LCCSMA • • • L - ______ Objectives C Comp. 1 – 6 Features LCCSMA • • • L - ______ Objectives C - _______ Objectives C – Content C_______ S – S_____ Materials M – M____ Activities A – Content A____

1. 1. Content Objectives: Measurable Action Verbs (Handout)_ • AWBAT list at least 2 1. 1. Content Objectives: Measurable Action Verbs (Handout)_ • AWBAT list at least 2 contributing factors leading to the outbreak of World War II. • AWBAT define the literary terms symbolism, allegory, and euphemism with 1 example for each term. • AWBAT calculate the amount of carpet needed to carpet an entire classroom using a spreadsheet. • AWBAT demonstrate their knowledge of animal cell structure by creating a reproduction from various given materials. • Never use ‘understand, ’ ‘appreciate, ’ ‘learn, ’ --- (not measurable) ‘know, ’

1. 2. Language Objectives: 6 Categories 1. Key vocabulary – technical terms, concept words, 1. 2. Language Objectives: 6 Categories 1. Key vocabulary – technical terms, concept words, e. g. , TESOL, institutional racism, language objectives 2. Language functions – how the language is used, e. g. , describe, compare, summarize 3. Language skills – 4 language modalities, e. g. , reading, listening, speaking, and writing 4. Grammar or language structures – questioning patterns, paragraph writing, and structural clues 5. Lesson tasks – language embedded in a task that could be made explicit and taught to ELLs, e. g. , make a poster using a Venn diagram ----6. Language learning strategies – corrective, self-monitoring, prereading, or language practice strategies, e. g. , process writing

Let’s teach your mini-lesson! • With the mini-lessons you prepared, you share it with Let’s teach your mini-lesson! • With the mini-lessons you prepared, you share it with your partner, and write (revise) them on the poster board on the wall. • A couple of the faculty may present the minilessons to the whole group!

1. 3. Content Concept appropriate for age and educational background • Background information needed 1. 3. Content Concept appropriate for age and educational background • Background information needed to get new concepts – previous life experience and prior schooling • Concept understanding in L 1 (Korean) • Peer tutoring, small group jump-start lessons What content concepts have you taught in your content classes? How are you going to connect from the previous knowledge and the new concept ?

1. 4. Supplementary Materials used to a high degree Various Learning Styles • Multiple 1. 4. Supplementary Materials used to a high degree Various Learning Styles • Multiple Intelligences by Howard Gardner(1983) – Linguistic intelligence ("word smart"): – Logical-mathematical intelligence ("number/reasoning smart") – Spatial intelligence ("picture smart") – Bodily-Kinesthetic intelligence ("body smart") – Musical intelligence ("music smart") – Interpersonal intelligence ("people smart") – Intrapersonal intelligence ("self smart") – Naturalist intelligence ("nature smart") See, hear, feel, perform, create, participate in order to make connections to and construct personal, relevant meanings Hands-on manipulatives, realia, pictures, visuals, multimedia, demonstration, related literature, hi-lo readers, & adapted text

1. 5. Adaptation of Content to all levels of student proficiency: Comprehensible Input (i+1) 1. 5. Adaptation of Content to all levels of student proficiency: Comprehensible Input (i+1) • Make the text and other resource materials accessible & comprehensible for ALL students; • Adapt the strategies: Pre-, during- , and postteaching; • Graphic organizers, outlines, study guides (notetaking T chart), reserved highlighted text, taped text (native speakers – U-tubes), adapted text, jigsaw, marginal notes, bilingual texts (English and Korean)

1. 6. Meaningful activities that integrate lesson concepts with language practice opportunities • Connect 1. 6. Meaningful activities that integrate lesson concepts with language practice opportunities • Connect between what students know and what they are learning by relating classroom experiences to their own lives! • Cognitively appropriate (CONTENT) and language appropriate activities; • Differentiated Instruction (DI); • Sample lesson plan 1 • Sample lesson plan 2

Stop & Assess Teaching Scenarios • Mr. Cullen • Mr. Ryan • Ms. Sauerbraun Stop & Assess Teaching Scenarios • Mr. Cullen • Mr. Ryan • Ms. Sauerbraun Rate each teacher after reading their scenarios using 6 features of the component 1 and choose the numbers as a group; Write the rationale of your ratings as a group Present your ratings and rationale to a whole group;

Exit Slip; Have we achieved what we have planned? • Content Objectives – AWBAT Exit Slip; Have we achieved what we have planned? • Content Objectives – AWBAT describe the SIOP coaching procedure and identify the most significant step; – Identify content objectives that are strong in terms of measuring the grade appropriate academic performance; ; – Analyze the teaching scenario as a group using the 6 features of Comp. 1; • Language Objectives – AWBAT write at least one content and language objectives; – Explain the importance of meaningful academic activities for your EFL students; – Discuss at least two advantages of writing C and L objectives; – Present orally about the analysis of the teaching scenario; – Present a mini-lesson using at least one CO & one LO with an assessment plan;