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SUPPORT YOUR CHILD WITH READING AT HOME SUPPORT YOUR CHILD WITH READING AT HOME

It's the most important thing you can do to help you child succeed. Books It's the most important thing you can do to help you child succeed. Books contain new words that will help build your child's language and understanding. Reading together is fun and helps build relationships. Why is reading important? The impact lasts a lifetime. Readers are more confident and have greater job opportunities. Children learn by example, so if they see you reading, they are likely to want to join in. Reading allows us to experience new things

3 Stages of Developing Reading to your child Reading aloud together Listening to your 3 Stages of Developing Reading to your child Reading aloud together Listening to your child read aloud

TUNING IN Your child may: • Enjoy listening to stories and joining in • TUNING IN Your child may: • Enjoy listening to stories and joining in • Know how books work (start at beginning, read from left to right) • Know some sounds and letter names • Notice print in the environment You can help by: • Reading yourself – set a good example for your children. Make sure your child sees members of your family reading. • Make time for reading- read aloud to your child as often as you can, let your child hold the book and turn the pages • Keeping books safe – create a special place for your child to keep their books and show them how to value and look after them • Spend time looking at the pictures and talking about what is happening- help your child to tell the story from using the pictures in the book. • Spend time talking about the book • Point to words as you read them • Pointing out print in shops, on packets and tins, road signs, etc • Accept and praise your child’s attempts to read • Playing ‘I Spy’ • Learning nursery rhymes together and songs • Visit the library • Buy books as presents • Keep story tapes in the car for long journeys Try to avoid: • Reading at busy / noisy times. Avoid distractions (tv)

COTTONING ON Your child may: • Be able to read by sight common words COTTONING ON Your child may: • Be able to read by sight common words e. g. the, and, that, she, he • Use pictures as clues to what is happening • Know the first sounds of some words • Tell you what will happen next • Be able to read familiar stories or poems with confidence. You can help by: • Pointing out words your child knows in different situations eg. when you are reading to them, in the shops, on labels and jars etc • Reading to your child, pointing out the words as you read. Point out long or interesting words. • Let them read to as many people as possible • PPP- Pause, Prompt, Praise • Encourage self-correction • Pointing out the first sound in some words • Letting your child re-tell the story • Ask them what they liked about the book; who their favourite character was; what they thought of the pictures, etc. • Stopping part of the way through the story and asking them what they think might happen next and why • Compare events and people in the book with your own lives. • Visit the library • Buy books as presents • Encourage your child to write messages to people • Leave plenty of scrap paper around for them to use Try and avoid: • Letting your child sound out every word

TAKING OFF Your child may: • Read on their own • Start to put TAKING OFF Your child may: • Read on their own • Start to put expression into what they read • Have a go at words they don’t know • Enjoy different kinds of books • Choose their own books You can help by: • Reading books to them that may be too difficult for them to read on their own, but which they can enjoy • Visiting a library regularly- take them to any story telling sessions that are advertised • Allowing your child to choose books that interest them • Encourage them to ‘take risks’ by trying unknown words. • Letting them listen to stories on CDs. (this will help them to read with expression) • Encouraging them to read a wide range eg. recipes, magazines, advertisements, etc • Talk about books they have read at school • Encourage them to persevere with a book, reading from beginning to end • Occasionally ask some ‘why’ questions • Involve the family in telling stories e. g. “I’ll tell you a story if you tell me one. ” Try to avoid: • Letting your child sound out every word

IN CONTROL Your child may: • Be able to read silently • Like to IN CONTROL Your child may: • Be able to read silently • Like to spend a lot of time reading and not be interrupted • Be able to tell you their opinions of a book • Use basic reference books • Start to find information in books You can help by: • By continuing to read to your child • Asking them questions about books they have read eg. what was your favourite part? Who did you like best? • Visiting a library regularly • Listening to story CDs • Encouraging them to read a wide range eg. recipes, magazines, newspapers, etc • Telling them about the book you are currently reading – what you like about it, etc. • Encourage them to read to their siblings Try to avoid: • Giving up sharing books • Picture books aren’t just for younger children!

The Griny Grollers grangled in the grounchy gak. But the squadron galloped on inexorably The Griny Grollers grangled in the grounchy gak. But the squadron galloped on inexorably through it all towards the wire at the top of the hill, and I went with them. War Horse – Michael Morpurgo Support your child with finding the meaning of a new word by: • Using resources such as a dictionary • Looking for root words they recognise that may help decipher a word • Identifying pre-fixes that will help them to understand e. g. audio – listening / hearing, micro – small, il / dis / un – turns into opposite • Using the context of the word (can they work out what type of word it is e. g adjective, noun, etc.

How to make more out of a book • Choose a time when you How to make more out of a book • Choose a time when you can both relax and enjoy the activity. • Make sure you handle the book correctly. • Before you start you can talk to your child about the book: • Look at the cover together, ask, “What do you think the book is going to be about? ” • Point to the author’s (and illustrator’s) name, make sure your child knows what these words mean. Discuss whether you have read books by this author before. • While reading, occasionally ask questions such as: • What do you think will happen next? • What do you think about that? • Make comments about similar situations/characters in other books you have read before together. • After you have finished the book, ask your child for their opinion e. g. “What was your favourite part? Why? ”