Скачать презентацию Story Elements Characters A dynamic character is Скачать презентацию Story Elements Characters A dynamic character is

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Story Elements Story Elements

Characters A dynamic character is one who goes through a personality change due to Characters A dynamic character is one who goes through a personality change due to the events in the story. A static character is one whose personality does not change throughout the story.

Round Characters A round character is one whose personality, background, motives, and other features Round Characters A round character is one whose personality, background, motives, and other features are fully described or explained by the author. In general, main characters are round because many insights are given.

Flat Characters A flat character is one who is not fully described but is Flat Characters A flat character is one who is not fully described but is useful in carrying out some narrative purpose of the author. They tend to be minor characters.

Dynamic and Round In most books the main character is both dynamic and round. Dynamic and Round In most books the main character is both dynamic and round.

Round and Static Characters can be round and static. For example, think about the Round and Static Characters can be round and static. For example, think about the character James Bond. We know a great deal about this character’s personality (round), yet he does not go through an inner personality change from the beginning to the end of the story (static). Often the side-kick in a story is round and static.

Dynamic and Flat Characters cannot be dynamic and flat, because in a flat character Dynamic and Flat Characters cannot be dynamic and flat, because in a flat character we do not know enough about them to recognize a change.

Dynamic or Static Round or Flat Ebenezer Scrooge from Charles Dickens's A Christmas Carol Dynamic or Static Round or Flat Ebenezer Scrooge from Charles Dickens's A Christmas Carol

Dynamic and Round Dynamic and Round

Dynamic or Static Round or Flat Billy Coleman from Wilson Rawls Where the Red Dynamic or Static Round or Flat Billy Coleman from Wilson Rawls Where the Red Fern Grows

Dynamic and Round Dynamic and Round

Dynamic or Static Round or Flat Will Coleman (Billy’s dad) from Wilson Rawls’ Where Dynamic or Static Round or Flat Will Coleman (Billy’s dad) from Wilson Rawls’ Where the Red Fern Grows

Static and Flat Static and Flat

Dynamic or Static Round or Flat Mayor Cole from Jeanne Du. Prau’s The City Dynamic or Static Round or Flat Mayor Cole from Jeanne Du. Prau’s The City of Ember

Static and Flat Static and Flat

Dynamic or Static Round or Flat Lina Mayfleet from Jeanne Du. Prau’s The City Dynamic or Static Round or Flat Lina Mayfleet from Jeanne Du. Prau’s The City of Ember

Dynamic and Round Dynamic and Round

Dynamic or Static Round or Flat Robin from Batman Dynamic or Static Round or Flat Robin from Batman

Static and Round Static and Round

Dynamic or Static Round or Flat Mandy, Ella's fairy godmother from Gail Carson Levine's Dynamic or Static Round or Flat Mandy, Ella's fairy godmother from Gail Carson Levine's Ella Enchanted

 static round static round

Dynamic or Static Round or Flat Ella from Gail Carson Levine's Ella Enchanted Dynamic or Static Round or Flat Ella from Gail Carson Levine's Ella Enchanted

dynamic round dynamic round

Dynamic or Static Round or Flat Weasel from Cynthia De. Felice's Weasel Dynamic or Static Round or Flat Weasel from Cynthia De. Felice's Weasel

Static and Round Static and Round

Dynamic or Static Round or Flat Harry Potter from J. K. Rowling's Harry Potter Dynamic or Static Round or Flat Harry Potter from J. K. Rowling's Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone

Dynamic and Round Dynamic and Round

Assignment On your story map list these characters in The Cay. • Phillip Enright Assignment On your story map list these characters in The Cay. • Phillip Enright • Timothy • Mrs. Enright (Grace) • Mr. Enright (Phillip) • Henrik van Boven Label each as dynamic or static & round or flat.

Assignment - Answer Key • • • Phillip Enright dynamic round Timothy static round Assignment - Answer Key • • • Phillip Enright dynamic round Timothy static round Mrs. Enright (Grace) static flat Mr. Enright (Phillip) static flat Henrik van Boven static flat

Setting The setting of a story includes the time and place in which the Setting The setting of a story includes the time and place in which the story takes place. Some stories may have more than one setting.

Setting What is the setting for Where the Red Fern Grows? Setting What is the setting for Where the Red Fern Grows?

Setting Where the Red Fern Grows is set in the Ozark Mountains on Cherokee Setting Where the Red Fern Grows is set in the Ozark Mountains on Cherokee land in northeastern Oklahoma during the Great Depression.

Setting What is the setting for The City of Ember? Setting What is the setting for The City of Ember?

Setting The City of Ember is set in an underground city in the future. Setting The City of Ember is set in an underground city in the future.

Setting THE LION AND THE MOUSE by Aesop A lion asleep in his den Setting THE LION AND THE MOUSE by Aesop A lion asleep in his den was wakened by a mouse running over his face. Losing his temper, he seized it with his paw and was about to kill it. The mouse, terrified, pleaded to the lion to spare its life. "Please let me go, " it cried, "and one day I will repay you for your kindness. " The idea of so small a creature ever being able to do anything for him amused the lion so much that he laughed aloud and let it go. But the mouse's chance came after all. One day the lion got tangled in a net. The mouse heard the lion’s roars of distress and ran to help. Without hesitation it set to work to gnaw the ropes with its teeth and succeeded before long in setting the lion free. "There!" said the mouse, “You laughed at me when I promised I would repay you, but now you see that even a mouse can help a lion. " What is the most likely setting for this fable? A. B. C. D. a zoo a savannah a desert a swamp

Assignment On your story map fill in the setting box for The Cay. (Note: Assignment On your story map fill in the setting box for The Cay. (Note: List 2 locations. )

Assignment – Answer Key 1. February 1942 on the island of Curacao, then part Assignment – Answer Key 1. February 1942 on the island of Curacao, then part of the Dutch West Indies. 2. When Phillip is ship-wrecked, the setting shifts to an unnamed cay deep in the Devil's Mouth, the long U-shaped coral banks in the Caribbean. Most of the action takes place between April and August of 1942, although the narrative actually concludes in April of 1943.

First-Person Point of View In the first-person point of view one character tells the First-Person Point of View In the first-person point of view one character tells the story. This character reveals only personal thoughts and feelings of what s/he sees. The writer uses pronouns such as "I“, "me“, “mine”, or "my". Example: I woke up this morning feeling terrific. I hopped out of bed excited to start the new day. I knew that today was the day my big surprise would come.

Second-Person Point of View With the second-person point of view the narrator tells the Second-Person Point of View With the second-person point of view the narrator tells the story using the pronoun "you". The character is someone similar to you. Example: You wake up feeling really terrific. Then you hop out of bed excited to start the new day. You know that today is the day that your big surprise will come. This is rarely used in literature. It can be seen in Choose Your Own Adventure books.

Third-Person Point of View The third-person point of view is the most commonly used Third-Person Point of View The third-person point of view is the most commonly used in fiction. When writing in the third-person you will use pronouns such as "he", "she", or "it". Example: Brian woke up feeling terrific. He hopped out of bed excited to start the new day. He knew that today was the day that his big surprise would come.

Group Practice Using your response cards, determine if each of the following excerpts are Group Practice Using your response cards, determine if each of the following excerpts are written in first, second, or third-point of view.

1 st, 2 nd, or 3 rd Point of View Excerpt from Woodsong by 1 st, 2 nd, or 3 rd Point of View Excerpt from Woodsong by Gary Paulsen I go up to the front of the team in the darkness and drag them around, realizing we are lost. My clothes have been ripped on tree limbs and my face is bleeding from cuts, and when I look back down the side of the mountain we have just climbed I see twentyseven head lamps bobbing up the trail. Twenty -seven teams have taken our smell as the valid trail and are following us. Twenty-seven teams must be met head on in the narrow brush and passed and told to turn around.

 Excerpt from Woodsong by Gary Paulsen First-Person Point of View Excerpt from Woodsong by Gary Paulsen First-Person Point of View

1 st, 2 nd, or 3 rd Point of View Excerpted from Soldier's Heart 1 st, 2 nd, or 3 rd Point of View Excerpted from Soldier's Heart by Gary Paulsen There would be a shooting war. There were rebels who had violated the law and fired on Fort Sumter and the only thing they'd respect was steel, it was said, and he knew they were right, and the Union was right, and one other thing they said as well--if a man didn't hurry he'd miss it. The only shooting war to come in a man's life and if a man didn't step right along he'd miss the whole thing. Charley didn't figure to miss it. The only problem was that Charley wasn't rightly a man yet, at least not to the army. He was fifteen and while he worked as a man worked, in the fields all of a day and into night, and looked like a man standing tall and just a bit thin with hands so big they covered a stove lid, he didn't make a beard yet and his voice had only just dropped enough so he could talk with men.

Excerpted from Soldier's Heart by Gary Paulsen Third-Person Point of View Excerpted from Soldier's Heart by Gary Paulsen Third-Person Point of View

Practice Number your paper from 1 – 10. Practice Number your paper from 1 – 10.

1 st, 2 nd, or 3 rd Point of View 1. Excerpted from Father 1 st, 2 nd, or 3 rd Point of View 1. Excerpted from Father Water, Mother Woods by Gary Paulsen It started that simply. At the courthouse or the library there was a large bulletin board, and for a dollar you could sign the board and write down your guess to win the car-through-the-ice raffle. Of course, you never met anyone who had won, but only those who knew somebody who had won, and therein, in the winning, the simplicity was lost.

1 st, 2 nd, or 3 rd Point of View 2. Excerpted from Nightjohn 1 st, 2 nd, or 3 rd Point of View 2. Excerpted from Nightjohn by Gary Paulsen A "Tonight we just do A. " He sat back on his heels and pointed. "There it be. " I looked at it, wondered how it stood. "Where's the bottom to it? " "There it stands on two feet, just like you. " "What does it mean? " "It means A--just like I said. It's the first letter in the alphabet. And when you see it you make a sound like this: ayyy, or ahhhh. " "That's reading? To make that sound? " He nodded. "When you see that letter on paper or a sack or in the dirt you make one of those sounds. That's reading. "

1 st, 2 nd, or 3 rd Point of View 3. Excerpted from Caught 1 st, 2 nd, or 3 rd Point of View 3. Excerpted from Caught by the Sea by Gary Paulsen I drove to California that very day, straight to the coast, then north, away from people, to a small town named Guadalupe, near Santa Maria. There I bought some cans of beans and bread and Spam and fruit cocktail and a cheap sleeping bag and then walked out through the sand dunes, where I could hear the surf crashing. I walked until I could see the water coming in, rolling in from the vastness, and I sat down and let the sea heal me.

1 st, 2 nd, or 3 rd Point of View 4. Excerpted from Guts 1 st, 2 nd, or 3 rd Point of View 4. Excerpted from Guts by Gary Paulsen I have spent an inordinate amount of time in wilderness woods, much of it in northern Minnesota, some in Canada and some in the Alaskan wilds. I have hunted and trapped and fished and have been exposed to almost all kinds of wilderness animals; I’ve had bear come at me, been stalked by a mountain lion, been bitten by snakes and punctured by porcupines and torn by foxes and once pecked by an attacking raven, but I have never seen anything rivaling the madness that seems to infect a large portion of the moose family.

1 st, 2 nd, or 3 rd Point of View 5. Excerpted from Winterkill 1 st, 2 nd, or 3 rd Point of View 5. Excerpted from Winterkill by Gary Paulsen And I would like to stop the story of Duda here and tell how he got his divorce and married Bonnie and they adopted me and we bought a farm. . That's how it would end in a movie, with Rock Hudson playing Duda and Doris Day playing Bonnie, and that's how it should end, and that's how I dream of it ending almost every night, until I wake up sweating and remember that it isn't a movie and it doesn't end that way.

6. Choose the sentence that is written using a first person point of view. 6. Choose the sentence that is written using a first person point of view. A. While walking home, he tripped and fell into a puddle of water. B. I believe that it’s important for students to be involved in after school activities. C. The City Council should reconsider its recent vote on a tax increase. D. Citizens need to exercise their right to vote in the next election.

7. Choose the sentence that is written using a third person point of view. 7. Choose the sentence that is written using a third person point of view. A. Several of their players have signed scholarships to play college football. B. You should know better than to send a text message while driving! C. We need to take our time on this project; we could both use a good grade. D. The red car with the black convertible top is mine.

8. Choose the sentence that is written using a first person point of view. 8. Choose the sentence that is written using a first person point of view. A. You need to do your best on the English test tomorrow. B. Would you please pass the mashed potatoes? C. Softball is my favorite sport, but soccer is a close second. D. Darrell went to the movies with John this weekend.

 9. Determine the point of view of the following passage. Walking home, I 9. Determine the point of view of the following passage. Walking home, I heard someone running behind me. I was frightened. A tall man ran by me. He raced to an emergency police phone and frantically began pushing buttons. The man brushed sweat from his forehead and then noticed me standing there. “Hurry, ” he began, “we need to get out of here quickly. There’s been an accident at the plant. ” What point of view is used in this passage? A. first person B. second person C. third person D. fourth person

10. Read the following excerpt from O. Henry’s The Ransom of Red Chief and 10. Read the following excerpt from O. Henry’s The Ransom of Red Chief and determine the point of view. “IT LOOKED like a good thing: but wait till I tell you. We were down South, in Alabama -- Bill Driscoll and myself -- when this kidnapping idea struck us. It was, as Bill afterward expressed it, "during a moment of temporary mental apparition"; but we didn't find that out till later. ” A. first person B. second person C. third person D. fourth person

Answer Key 1. second 2. third 3. first 4. first 5. first 6. B Answer Key 1. second 2. third 3. first 4. first 5. first 6. B 7. A 8. C 9. A 10. A

Third-Person Point of View Third-person point of view may be written using several variations. Third-Person Point of View Third-person point of view may be written using several variations. In the third-person objective the story is told without describing any character's thoughts, opinions, or feelings. Think of this as seeing what a camera can see. A camera can not see what is going on inside someone’s mind.

Third-Person Objective Third-person objective is rarely used except in easy picture books. Example The Third-Person Objective Third-person objective is rarely used except in easy picture books. Example The alarm clock sounded. Brian cut off the clock and jumped out of bed. He had a smile on his face.

Third-Person Point of View In the third-person omniscient, the reader knows exactly what is Third-Person Point of View In the third-person omniscient, the reader knows exactly what is going on inside various characters’ heads in regards to their thoughts and feelings. Rob is Joe is sad. Tim is sneaky. surprised. Pete is in love.

Third-Person Omniscient Example from Woods Runner by Gary Paulsen Although Samuel's parents lived in Third-Person Omniscient Example from Woods Runner by Gary Paulsen Although Samuel's parents lived in the wilderness, they were not a part of it. They had been raised in towns and had been educated in schools where they'd been taught to read and write and play musical instruments. They moved west when Samuel was a baby, so that they could devote themselves to a quiet life of hard physical work and contemplation. They loved the woods, but they did not understand them. Not like Samuel. (Here the reader knows both the parents’ and Samuel’s feelings. )

Third-Person Point of View In third-person limited, the reader knows only one character's mind, Third-Person Point of View In third-person limited, the reader knows only one character's mind, either throughout the entire work or in a specific section. The narration is limited to what can be known, seen, thought, or judged from a single character's perspective. Sally wondered what the boys were thinking.

Practice with Point of View http: //mrshatzi. com/files/pointofview-ws. pdf http: //www. tusd 1. org/resources/curriculum/hs/9 Practice with Point of View http: //mrshatzi. com/files/pointofview-ws. pdf http: //www. tusd 1. org/resources/curriculum/hs/9 R 2 C 1 PO 1_3. doc

Answer Key with Point of View Guided Practice 1. first person 2. third person Answer Key with Point of View Guided Practice 1. first person 2. third person limited 3. third person omniscient

Answer Key with Point of View 1. From Maniac Magee by Jerry Spinelli - Answer Key with Point of View 1. From Maniac Magee by Jerry Spinelli - third person limited 2. From the Mixed-Up files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler, by E. L. Konigsburg - third person limited 3. From The Twenty-One Balloons by William Pene du Bois - first person 4. From Number the Stars by Lois Lowry - third person limited 5. From Missing May by Cynthia Rylant - first person 6. From The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe by C. S. Lewis - third person omniscient 7. From I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou - first person 8. From The Olympic Games by Theodore Knight - third person limited 9. From “Through the Tunnel” by Doris Lessing - third person omniscient 10. From “Pictures on a Rock” by Brent Ashabranner - third person limited

Assignment On your story map, fill in the Point of View box for The Assignment On your story map, fill in the Point of View box for The Cay.

Assignment – Answer Key first-person Assignment – Answer Key first-person

Conflict is the struggle between the opposing forces on which the action in a Conflict is the struggle between the opposing forces on which the action in a work of literature depends. In short stories, there is usually one major conflict. In longer stories, there could be several conflicts.

Conflict Some forms of conflict include the following: • Person vs. Person • Person Conflict Some forms of conflict include the following: • Person vs. Person • Person vs. Self • Person vs. the Environment • Person vs. Technology

Person vs. Person A person vs. person conflict is between two forms of like Person vs. Person A person vs. person conflict is between two forms of like beings. Examples From Where the Red Fern Grows - Billy and his dogs are attacked by a mountain lion, and they must do everything they can to survive. From Weasel Nathan is captured by Weasel, an Indian fighter. Earlier in the book, Weasel had attacked Nathan's pa, had taken away Pa’s riffle, and had killed the farm animals.

Person vs. Self In a person vs. self conflict the main character has a Person vs. Self In a person vs. self conflict the main character has a problem within him/herself. Examples From Weasel Nathan spends the winter months struggling with his conscious. Should he go back to Weasel’s cabin to seek revenge or forget about Weasel?

Person vs. the Environment In a person vs. the environment conflict a character is Person vs. the Environment In a person vs. the environment conflict a character is struggling against the forces of nature. Example: From Where the Red Fern Grows - Little Ann and Old Dan tree a coon in the tallest tree in the river bottoms. From Where the Red Fern Grows - Billy enters the championship coon hunt and encounters the snowstorm.

Person vs. Technology In a person vs. technology conflict, a character has a problem Person vs. Technology In a person vs. technology conflict, a character has a problem with robots or machines. Example From Hatchet - Brian flying the airplane after the pilot dies.

Practice Number your paper from 1 – 10. Practice Number your paper from 1 – 10.

1. The house could have easily been the scene for a horror movie. On 1. The house could have easily been the scene for a horror movie. On the outside, its fading paint job, broken windows, and creaking porch swing provided a hint to what we would find on the inside. The front door swung open to the inside, forcing us to enter the building before we could glimpse the contents. Several families had lived in the house through the years, most recently the Duttons. Every inch of the front room was covered in dust, and cobwebs hung in every corner. We immediately started hearing sounds, soft moans like those of a sick person. The scariest thing we saw was a portrait of an evil looking man above the mantle. His eyes appeared to follow us as we moved farther into the room. Which sentence that describes the setting of a story is most likely to lead to the main conflict? A. The front door swung open to the inside, forcing us to enter the building before we could glimpse the contents. B. Several families had lived in the house through the years, most recently the Duttons. C. Every inch of the front room was covered in dust, and cobwebs hung in every corner. D. We immediately started hearing sounds, soft moans like those of a sick person.

2. The Missing Chip “Here, Chip. Come here, boy. ” Jackson stood in the 2. The Missing Chip “Here, Chip. Come here, boy. ” Jackson stood in the open doorway, calling to his dog. The boy stood still and listened. He hoped he would hear the sound of Chip’s rustling the bushes as he came bounding to the door. As the boy stood there, he heard the birds chirping in the treetops. He heard the tractor in the field across from his house. He heard many sounds of nature, but he did not hear Chip. Jackson closed the door and spoke to his mother. “I don’t know where Chip could be, ” he said. “I haven’t seen him since yesterday morning. ” “Why don’t you ride your bike around the neighborhood to see if you can find him? ” suggested Mom. Jackson put on his shoes and his jacket and headed for the door. “Be careful on the road, ” said Mom. “If a car comes, pull your bicycle over to the far side of the ditch. ” Jackson rode across the creek bridge, calling out to his dog. “Chip, come here, boy. Here, Chip!” The daffodils fluttered as he rode past them. Jackson looked across the field. He scanned the cow pasture as he rode along the fencerow. There was no sign of the dog. Jackson stopped his bicycle in front of Mr. Yoder’s barn. He stood still and listened. He thought he could hear a faint whimpering sound coming from the barn. He pedaled quickly toward the barn. “Chip! Here, Chip!” he called as he raced. He climbed off his bike quickly and let it fall to the ground. The whimpering sound was coming from inside the barn.

2. Continued Jackson climbed over the barn gate and went inside. His eyes panned 2. Continued Jackson climbed over the barn gate and went inside. His eyes panned the stalls and the hay, but he saw no sign of Chip. Just then he heard movement from the left side of the barn, and the whimpering began again. “Chip, I’m here, boy, ” Jackson said as he rushed to a broken board behind a small wagon. Chip had somehow climbed between the broken boards and was stuck in the wall. “How did you get in there, boy? ” Jackson asked. The hole was much smaller than the basset hound. “You must have chased something behind the boards, and that’s how you got stuck. I’ll get you out of here, ” Jackson said. The boy sat on his knees and tugged on each board until he found one that was loose. He wriggled the board and pried the nail loose until the board finally came off, enlarging the opening. He reached his arm inside and pulled the dog back through the hole. Chip shook the dust from his coat. Jackson scratched his hound behind the ears. “Come on, boy, ” he said. “Let’s go home. ” What is the main conflict of the story? A. B. C. D. Jackson cannot find his basset hound, Chip rides his bike through the neighborhood. Jackson has to find a way to free his dog. Chip could not find the hole in the barn.

Read this story; then answer questions 3 & 4. The Cardboard Surprise“Mom, have you Read this story; then answer questions 3 & 4. The Cardboard Surprise“Mom, have you seen Jasper? ” Marie asked as she walked into the kitchen. “I can’t find her anywhere. ” “Did you check the garage? ” Mom replied. Marie turned in her tracks and headed outside to check the garage. She grabbed her coat and mittens, which were hanging by the door. She flipped on the porch light and shut the door behind her. “Here, Kitty, ” she called as she walked along the driveway to the garage behind the house, the noise of the city traffic nearly drowning the sound of her voice. Marie opened the garage door and shut it behind her. The noise remained outside. “Jasper Kitty, ” she sang. “Where are you, Jasper? ” She flipped on the light so that she could see in the shadows. “There you are, ” she cried, spying the calico in a cardboard box underneath some old shelves in the corner. “Come here, girl, ” Marie pleaded, but she could not get the cat to move. “Well, if you won’t come to me, I will go to you, ” Marie reasoned. She moved the junk that was in her way. She pushed a tricycle to the left. She lifted two old boxes and balanced them on the tricycle seat and handlebars. She stepped her feet gingerly between piles of rope and stray yard tools. Finally she reached the box where Jasper rested. Marie tipped the edge of the box out into the light so that she could see inside it. “Oh, my!” she said. “No wonder you didn’t come when I called! You have baby kittens!” Marie rubbed Jasper’s belly as the newborn kittens wriggled their heads into their mother’s fur. “One, two, three, four…” Marie counted. “You have four baby

3. What is the main conflict of the story? A. B. C. D. The 3. What is the main conflict of the story? A. B. C. D. The family keeps too much junk in the garage. The girl, Marie, found the cat and her kittens. Marie cannot find her cat, Jasper. The cat, Jasper, had four kittens. E. 4. How is the conflict resolved? F. G. H. I. Marie cannot find her cat, Jasper has had four new kittens. The girl cleans out the garage, throwing the junk in the garbage. Marie found the cat with its new kittens in a box in the garage.

5. The Jump Drive “Jontez, it’s 7: 15. The school bus will be here 5. The Jump Drive “Jontez, it’s 7: 15. The school bus will be here in five minutes, ” Mom hollered up the stairs. “I’m almost ready, ” Jontez replied from his room on the second floor. Less than a minute later, Jontez bounded down the stairs. “Have you seen my math binder? ” Jontez asked. “No, I haven’t seen it, ” said Mom. “The binder has my jump drive in it. My math project is due today, and it is saved on my jump drive, ” Jontez explained. Mom thought for a moment. “What were you doing with the binder the last time you had it? ” she asked. “I was using it as a hard surface to write my spelling words on, ” answered Jontez. “Where were you, Tez, while you were writing the spelling words? ” “Sitting on my bed, ” he said. “And what did you do when you were finished? ” “I walked downstairs and got a soda from the kitchen, ” replied Jontez.

5. Continued “Did you bring your binder with you? ” questioned Mom. Jontez thought 5. Continued “Did you bring your binder with you? ” questioned Mom. Jontez thought for a minute. He retraced his steps in his mind. “Yes, I did, ” he said finally, his face lighting up. Jontez walked over the counter beside the refrigerator. There was a stack of papers lying there. “I put it down right here, ” he said, lifting the top half of the papers. “And here it is!” he exclaimed. Just then Jontez heard the bus’ brakes squeal as the bus stopped outside his house. “Thanks, Mom, ” he said, and he quickly kissed her cheek before heading out the door. How is the conflict resolved? A. B. C. D. Jontez’s mother punishes him for losing the binder. Jontez finds the binder on the counter in the kitchen. The binder is found under the bed where Jontez had been working. The boy cannot find the binder that has his math project in it.

6. Read this excerpt from Gary Paulsen's book How Angel Peterson Got His Name. 6. Read this excerpt from Gary Paulsen's book How Angel Peterson Got His Name. There was--this is important--no television. There were just two channels in the major cities on the East and West Coasts. Almost nobody in town had a set. A TV set at that time was a huge buzzing, hissing black-and-white monster that had the added benefit of being dangerous. The coating on the inside of the picture tube required no less than forty-two thousand volts to operate, an amount that could easily kill fifteen or twenty horses. When television finally did come to the small towns up in Minnesota many a cat was turned into something close to a six-hundred-watt lightbulb by sticking his nose back in the power supply area of a console television set, trying to investigate the little crackling sounds and blue glow that came out of the ventilation holes. On his twelfth birthday, my pal Wayne Halverson licked the end of his finger and stuck it near the ventilation panel on his family's new RCA set. (Even though there was no television station programming to watch for nearly two more years they used it for a conversation piece and a place to put their bowling trophies, but my grandmother said the Halversons had always put on airs ever since Dewey, who was Wayne's great-greatgrandfather, was kicked in the head by a workhorse and found that he could do accounting. )

6. Continued Wayne never actually touched the top of the main rectifier tube and 6. Continued Wayne never actually touched the top of the main rectifier tube and so didn't get the full jolt, which would have cooked him on the spot, but it arced over to his finger and a lesser charge, say enough to light two or three singlefamily dwellings for a week or so, slammed him back into the wall and left him unconscious for several minutes. He later claimed that the incident was what made him the only one in our group who could actually talk to girls. Which type of conflict is present in this reading? A. B. C. D. Person vs. Self Person vs. the Environment Person vs. Technology

7. Read this excerpt from Gary Paulsen's book Brian's Hunt. He dreamt of it 7. Read this excerpt from Gary Paulsen's book Brian's Hunt. He dreamt of it often and at first his dreams sometimes had the qualities of nightmares. He dreamt he was sitting there in the small plane, the only passenger, with the pilot dying and the plane crashing into the lake below. He awakened sometimes with sudden fear, his breath coming fast. The crash itself had been so wild and he had been so out of control that the more he had grown in the years since, the more he had learned and handled difficult situations, the more insane the crash seemed; a wild, careening, ripping ride down through trees to end not in peace but in the water, nearly drowning--in the nightmares it was like dying and then not dying to die again. Which type of conflict is present in this reading? A. B. C. D. Person vs. Self Person vs. the Environment Person vs. Technology

8. Read this excerpt from Gary Paulsen's book My Life in Dog Years And 8. Read this excerpt from Gary Paulsen's book My Life in Dog Years And so Caesar entered my life. He became many things to us – friend, entertainer, horror show – but he was never, never boring and his life comes back now in a montage of memories. There was the Halloween when he greeted a little boy who came to the door in a werewolf costume. There was one moment, priceless, when the two eyed each other, hairy monster-mask to Great Dane muzzle, at exactly the same height. I’m not certain what the little boy expected but he didn’t quail – he leaned forward and growled. I’m not sure what Caesar had expected either but it certainly wasn’t an angry werewolf. He made a sound like a train in a tunnel and disappeared into a dark corner of the bedroom closet and would not come out until all the little people stopped coming and the doorbell quit ringing. And it might be noted that he had a remarkable memory. Every one of the seven years that he was with us, when the first trick-or-treater came to the door on Halloween, no matter the costume, Caesar went into the bedroom closet, pulled a housecoat over his eyes, and would not come out until it was over. He had great heart, but courage against monsters wasn’t in him. Which type of conflict is present in this reading? A. B. C. D. Person vs. Self Person vs. the Environment Person vs. Technology

9. Read this excerpt from Gary Paulsen's book Guts. There was a kind of 9. Read this excerpt from Gary Paulsen's book Guts. There was a kind of bleeeeekkkk, hoarse and very loud, coming from directly behind me and accompanied by a crashing in the brush, and I turned, raising my rifle (about as useful as a BB gun in these circumstances but we use what we have), to see two glaring red eyes coming at me at what seemed like sixty or seventy miles an hour. . . At the first instant I didn't realize that it was a large bull moose. He's lost the previous year's antlers and hadn't grown new ones yet. I just saw brown. I saw big. I saw death coming at me, snorting and thundering. I think I may have thought of phantoms, wood spirits, wild monsters-I most certainly did not think of moose. Which type of conflict is present in this reading? A. B. C. D. Person vs. Self Person vs. the Environment Person vs. Technology

10. Read this excerpt from Gary Paulsen's book The Beet Fields. The sun was 10. Read this excerpt from Gary Paulsen's book The Beet Fields. The sun was hot when it came up late. There was no early-morning coolness, no relief. An early heat came with the first edge of the sun and by the time the sun was full up, he was cooking and looking for some relief. He tried hoeing with his left hand low, then his right hand, then leaning forward more, then less, but nothing helped. It was hot, getting hotter, and he straightened and spit and resettled the straw hat he had bought in Grafton. It had a piece of green plastic in the brim that looked cool but wasn't. Which type of conflict is present in this reading? A. B. C. D. Person vs. Self Person vs. the Environment Person vs. Technology

1. D 2. A 3. C 4. D 5. B 6. D 7. B 1. D 2. A 3. C 4. D 5. B 6. D 7. B 8. A 9. A 10. C Answer Key

Assignment On your story map, fill in the conflict boxes for The Cay. Assignment On your story map, fill in the conflict boxes for The Cay.

Assignment Answer Key Conflict Person vs. The Environment Phillip and Timothy must survive the Assignment Answer Key Conflict Person vs. The Environment Phillip and Timothy must survive the hot sun, sharks, and lack of water while on the raft. Later they must live through a hurricane. Person vs. Self Phillip struggles with his prejudice of black people. Phillip has to learn to come to terms with his blindness to survive.

Plot The plot is the story that is told in a novel, play, or Plot The plot is the story that is told in a novel, play, or movie. The plot has five components. Plot Structure Components Exposition Rising Action Climax Falling Action Resolution

Exposition The exposition is the introduction of the story. It contains the setting, introduces Exposition The exposition is the introduction of the story. It contains the setting, introduces the main characters, and gives background information. It is the information needed to understand a story.

Rising Action The rising action is the portion of the story where a character Rising Action The rising action is the portion of the story where a character tries to solve the conflict. This is the longest part of the story.

Climax The climax is the tensest moment of the story. It is the turning Climax The climax is the tensest moment of the story. It is the turning point in the story that occurs when characters try to resolve the complication.

Falling Action The falling action is where the characters begin to apply a solution Falling Action The falling action is where the characters begin to apply a solution to the conflict and tie up loose ends.

Resolution The resolution is how everything turns out in the story. It is the Resolution The resolution is how everything turns out in the story. It is the set of events that bring the story to a close.

 Read this passage; then go to the next page to determine the resolution. Read this passage; then go to the next page to determine the resolution. Matt and Charlotte had never met their grandparents because they live across the country. Matt and Charlotte decided one day that they would like to meet them. All the way home from school, they talked about how they could contact them and possibly even go to see them. They decided to ask their parents for help. The parents seemed very anxious after talking to Matt and Charlotte. They said they needed time to think it over. Matt and Charlotte couldn't wait to get home from school the next day to see if their parents had made a decision. Finally, the school day was over. Matt and Charlotte ran in the house. Their parents smiled and handed them airplane tickets. Matt and Charlotte were headed to California to see their grandparents. Matt and Charlotte thanked their parents and ran to start packing.

What is the resolution in this passage? A. Matt and Charlotte are going to What is the resolution in this passage? A. Matt and Charlotte are going to see their grandparents. B. Matt and Charlotte attend school. C. Matt and Charlotte ask their parents to go and meet their grandparents. D. Matt and Charlotte had never met their grandparents.

Read this passage; then determine how the conflict is resolved. Cara’s I-Jet “Cara, the Read this passage; then determine how the conflict is resolved. Cara’s I-Jet “Cara, the airbus is approaching. The monitor has picked up the signal less than three miles away. It will be here in less than a minute, ” Mother said. “Can you send the AB a delay request? ” asked Cara. “I can’t find my I-Jet, and it has my homework stored on it for this whole semester. ” “You’ve already used your delay allotment for this month, ” answered Mother. “I believe you’ll just have to be on the hovermac, with or without your I-Jet, when the airbus arrives. ” Cara rushed back to her room. She looked under her sleeping station, but there was nothing there but dust and some old memory chips. She opened the doors of her clothing dock and rummaged through her AB suits. Cara found her grandmother’s old MP 3 -player stuck in the pocket of one of her AB suits.

 The MP 3 -player had been a keen device when her grandmother was The MP 3 -player had been a keen device when her grandmother was a child, but the old piece of technology hadn’t worked in 50 years. Cara just kept it as a reminder of how difficult life used to be. “ 20 seconds, ” Mom shouted from the food unit. Frustrated, Cara gave up the search. She grabbed an AB suit from the clothing dock and slipped it on. She ran outside to the hovermac and pushed the silver button, signaling the airbus that she was ready to be uploaded. The airbus appeared and hovered over the hovermac, lowering the platform to the ground. As Cara stepped onto the platform, she put her hand in the pocket of her AB suit and felt a cool steel casing. She pulled it from her pocket and opened the case. Inside was her I-Jet, just as she had left it. “There it is!” she exclaimed, relieved that her months of work would not have to be duplicated. A smile spread across her face as she and the platform disappeared inside the airbus.

 How is the conflict resolved? A. B. C. D. The airbus lowers the How is the conflict resolved? A. B. C. D. The airbus lowers the platform for Cara to get on. Cara searches her sleep station for the missing I-Jet. The airbus uploads Cara safely and transports her. Cara finds the I-Jet in the pocket of her AB suit.

Plot Structure Components http: //www. kanedlive. org/files/Plot%20 Resources. pdf (View page 4. ) Example Plot Structure Components http: //www. kanedlive. org/files/Plot%20 Resources. pdf (View page 4. ) Example with Cinderella http: //www. learningthroughlistening. org/Classroom. Teaching-Tools/Strategies-and-Activities/Graphic. Organizers/Plot-Structure/419/

Assignment Complete the Plot and Plot Diagram on your Story Map for The Cay. Assignment Complete the Plot and Plot Diagram on your Story Map for The Cay.

Assignment Answer Key Assignment Answer Key

Theme The theme is the insight about life or human nature that the writer Theme The theme is the insight about life or human nature that the writer shares with the reader. It is usually not stated directly, but must be inferred. The theme is the message of a story. Ask yourself this question. What should you learn from the story?

Practice with Theme THE LION AND THE MOUSE by Aesop A lion asleep in Practice with Theme THE LION AND THE MOUSE by Aesop A lion asleep in his den was wakened by a mouse running over his face. Losing his temper, he seized it with his paw and was about to kill it. The mouse, terrified, pleaded to the lion to spare its life. "Please let me go, " it cried, "and one day I will repay you for your kindness. " The idea of so small a creature ever being able to do anything for him amused the lion so much that he laughed aloud and let it go. But the mouse's chance came after all. One day the lion got tangled in a net. The mouse heard the lion’s roars of distress and ran to help. Without hesitation it set to work to gnaw the ropes with its teeth and succeeded before long in setting the lion free. "There!" said the mouse, "you laughed at me when I promised I would repay you; but now you see that even a mouse can help a lion. " What is theme of the story "The Lion and the Mouse? " A. hunter's net cannot hold a lion for long. B. A mouse is good at chewing things. C. Lions and mice make good pets. D. Size doesn't matter when doing a good deed.

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (excerpt) L. Frank Baum. Dorothy lived in the midst The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (excerpt) L. Frank Baum. Dorothy lived in the midst of the great Kansas prairies, with Uncle Henry, who was a farmer, and Aunt Em, who was the farmer's wife. Their house was small, for the lumber to build it had to be carried by wagon many miles. There were four walls, a floor and a roof, which made one room; and this room contained a rusty looking cookstove, a cupboard for the dishes, a table, three or four chairs, and the beds. Uncle Henry and Aunt Em had a big bed in one corner, and Dorothy a little bed in another corner. What is theme of the passage? A. B. C. D. the plain life of a prairie farm family the things found in a home on the prairie building a prairie home living away from your parents

“The Fox and the Goat” by Aesop (paraphrased) One day a fox fell into “The Fox and the Goat” by Aesop (paraphrased) One day a fox fell into a deep well and could not escape. A goat, very thirsty, came to the same well. When the goat saw the fox, he asked if the water was good. The fox, hiding his unfortunate problem by being cheerful, said the water was excellent. He encouraged the goat to jump down. The goat, paying attention to only his thirst, jumped down without thinking. Just as he drank, the fox told him of the difficulty they were both in and suggested an idea for their escape. "If, " said he, "you will place your front feet upon the wall and bend your head, I will run up your back and escape, and will help you out afterwards. " The goat gladly agreed, and the fox leaped upon his back. Steadying himself with the goat's horns, he safely reached the mouth of the well and made off as fast as he could. When the goat scolded the fox for breaking his promise, the fox turned around and cried out, "You foolish old fellow! If you had thought before you jumped into the well, you would never have gone down before you knew how to get back up, and you would not have exposed yourself to dangers from which you had no means of escape. " Choose the best answer. What is a universal theme in this story? A. B. C. D. Look before you leap. Be kind to your enemy. Slow and steady wins the race. Do not attempt too much at once.

Theme One way to determine theme is to make a T – Chart. On Theme One way to determine theme is to make a T – Chart. On the left write theme. On the left give examples to show this theme.

Theme Using Hatchet Theme Never give up - Determination Proof (Evidence) Brian kept flying Theme Using Hatchet Theme Never give up - Determination Proof (Evidence) Brian kept flying the plane and radioing for help after the pilot died. Brian hunted and searched for food. Brian built a shelter to protect himself from the elements. Brian kept working until he was able to get inside the plane to get the emergency pack.

Theme Using Weasel Theme seeking revenge vs. moral choices Proof (Evidence) Nathan hunts down Theme Using Weasel Theme seeking revenge vs. moral choices Proof (Evidence) Nathan hunts down the violent and disturbed man, but when the opportunity to strike arises, he realizes that such violence would make him no better than the assailant he has been hunting

Assignment Complete Theme section on your Story Map for The Cay. Assignment Complete Theme section on your Story Map for The Cay.

Assignment – Answer Key Survival Overcoming prejudices Assignment – Answer Key Survival Overcoming prejudices