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SIMP Strategic Information Management Program Government On-Line October 4, 2004 Christine Desloges Director General SIMP Strategic Information Management Program Government On-Line October 4, 2004 Christine Desloges Director General Public Works and Travaux publics et Government Services gouvernementaux Canada

GOL CD ROM Presentation Public Works and Travaux publics et Government Services gouvernementaux Canada GOL CD ROM Presentation Public Works and Travaux publics et Government Services gouvernementaux Canada

Canada – an overview Geography w 9, 984, 670 square kilometres, 6 time zones Canada – an overview Geography w 9, 984, 670 square kilometres, 6 time zones Demographics w 32 million people, 2 official languages w rural and urban - 77% live in cities and towns Three levels of government w federal; provincial / territorial (13); municipal (more than 5000) w Extensive collaboration – more than 3000 federal-provincial agreements on specific projects and issues The federal government w 126 federal departments, agencies and Crown corporations w responsible for more than 1600 programs and services w 317, 000 public servants; 16, 000 IT professionals in the federal government w IM/IT spending: approximately $4. 8 billion annually 3

Canadians and the Internet Canadians are among the most connected in the world l Canadians and the Internet Canadians are among the most connected in the world l 70% use the Internet on a regular basis Canadians are going on-line l 70% of Internet users have visited a Government of Canada ( Go. C) Web site l 34% indicated most recent contact with Go. C was through Internet Canadians want their governments to be on-line l 71% agree that the Internet is an effective way to communicate with them about government programs and services l 77% agree the Internet has made it easier to find information about government programs and services l 42% expect that they will do most of their transactions with the Go. C over the Internet in the next five years 4

Accenture Placed Canada’s GOL Initiative in the Service Transformation phase of e-government Countries progress Accenture Placed Canada’s GOL Initiative in the Service Transformation phase of e-government Countries progress through e. Government maturity through a series of plateaus Service Transformation Canada Mature Delivery Service Availability Basic Capability Online Presence Singapore, USA, Denmark, Australia, Finland, Hong Kong, UK, Belgium, Germany, Ireland, France The Netherlands, Spain, Japan, Norway, Italy, Malaysia Mexico, Portugal, Brazil, South Africa TIME Source: Accenture: e. Government leadership: Engaging the Customer, April 2003 5

Government On-Line l l l What is GOL? Why are we doing this? What Government On-Line l l l What is GOL? Why are we doing this? What are the results so far? Other success factors. What are some of the challenges? 6

The Government of Canada’s commitment. . . Speech from the Throne October 1999 SPEECH The Government of Canada’s commitment. . . Speech from the Throne October 1999 SPEECH FROM THE THRONE “Our goal is to be known around the world as the government most connected to its citizens, with Canadians able to access government information and services on-line at the time and place of their choosing” …to connectedness, accessibility and services delivery on-line 7

 GOL Initiative is … l l l a citizen-/client-centred and “whole of government”, GOL Initiative is … l l l a citizen-/client-centred and “whole of government”, time limited initiative, ending in 2005 -06 delivering 130 most commonly used services over the Internet to Individuals, Business and International clients by 2005 making government more accessible, making on-line service better and more responsive; and building confidence and trust in transacting on-line the collective efforts of 30 departments and agencies, the Canada Site, 3 Gateways and 31 clusters, and the PWGSC and TBS GOL teams. Approximate total of GOL funded projects: 150. 8

Where We Then? January 2000 The Canada Site l linked to 450 federal web Where We Then? January 2000 The Canada Site l linked to 450 federal web sites l different sites independently offered information and services to common clients - as a consequence: – – clients searched through multiple sites to find what we had to offer the work to find & assemble information and services components fell to the client Department & Agency Sites 9

VISION and MANDATE 10 VISION and MANDATE 10

Government On-Line is part of a cohesive strategy for a knowledge-based economy and society Government On-Line is part of a cohesive strategy for a knowledge-based economy and society Canada Online Canadian Smart Communities Content Online e. Citizen Electronic Government Connecting Commerce On-Line Canada to the World e. Business e. Government … 11

Client-centricity and a whole-ofgovernment approach… The Go. C Service Vision GOL Target Using information Client-centricity and a whole-ofgovernment approach… The Go. C Service Vision GOL Target Using information and communication technology to enhance Canadians’ access to improved client-centred, clustered services, anytime, anywhere and in the official language of their choice Making the 130 most frequently used services available on-line by 2005 … guide the Go. C Service Vision and the GOL Initiative 12

A five-part workplan for the service vision l Service delivery: user-centric approach to service A five-part workplan for the service vision l Service delivery: user-centric approach to service delivery and multi- channel integration, driven by client priorities, satisfaction, efficiencies and feasibility l Common secure infrastructure: electronic service platform to enable integrated services and support secure Internet, telephone and in -person access l Policy: build citizen confidence in e-services by addressing privacy, security and information management l Human resources: cross-government approach to develop the right skills for electronic and other service delivery, focused on change management and competencies l Communication: encourage take-up, engage citizens to shape service evolution, assure citizens of commitment to channel choice, and reporting to Parliament 13

A GOVERNANCE MODEL FOR GOL AND SERVICE IMPROVEMENT Public Works and Travaux publics et A GOVERNANCE MODEL FOR GOL AND SERVICE IMPROVEMENT Public Works and Travaux publics et Government Services gouvernementaux Canada

Interdepartmental committees supporting GOL and Service Strategy Deputy Minister Committee (GOL/Service Oversight) GOL Leads Interdepartmental committees supporting GOL and Service Strategy Deputy Minister Committee (GOL/Service Oversight) GOL Leads Service and Information Management Board CIO Council (CIOC) Information Management Champions Service Architecture Transformation Review Committee Board Information Management & Policies Committee Information Technology Champions Service Delivery http: //www. gol-ged. gc. ca/governance/gov-gouv_e. asp Champions 15

PLANNING FRAMEWORK 16 PLANNING FRAMEWORK 16

GOL Requires Comprehensive. . . Priorities for 2000 Achieve December 31, 2000 targets • GOL Requires Comprehensive. . . Priorities for 2000 Achieve December 31, 2000 targets • Lay the foundation to ensure long-term success Human Service Resources Transformation Information and Technology Communications • Communications Governance and Accountabilities Risk Management …and interrelated management frameworks 17

GOL requires multiple streams of work HR Management Digital Service Standards Public Access Strategy GOL requires multiple streams of work HR Management Digital Service Standards Public Access Strategy Citizen Needs Privacy and Security Governance and Accountability Business Processes Getting GOL Requires Procurement Cluster / Portal GOL Framework Resourcing Strategy Information Management Communications Pathfinder Projects IM/IT Infrastructure Digital Branding 18

Government On-Line Migration Strategy Convergence Multijurisdictional Tier Three Interdepartmental Service Transformation Seamless Government Tier Government On-Line Migration Strategy Convergence Multijurisdictional Tier Three Interdepartmental Service Transformation Seamless Government Tier Two Intradepartmental Fully Enabled ESD Channel Refinement Tier One Single Business Line On-Line Presence Information Initiation Interaction Integration 19

GOL: A Phased Approach. . . Tier One Tier Two Tier Three ON-LINE PRESENCE GOL: A Phased Approach. . . Tier One Tier Two Tier Three ON-LINE PRESENCE ELECTRONIC SERVICE DELIVERY PARTNERSHIPS • information on programs and services • access to key forms on-line • a revamped Go. C portal • key government services on-line • secure transactions • electronic filing • electronic payments • brand recognition • inter-jurisdictional sites and services based on client needs December 2000 December 2004 De ne dli a Pilots through the 2000 -2004 time period …based on clear and achievable targets 20

Guidance, Tools, and Common Approaches. . . l Communications strategy linked to deliverables l Guidance, Tools, and Common Approaches. . . l Communications strategy linked to deliverables l Strong project management using the Enhanced Management Framework l Year 2000 lessons learned applied to GOL l Information and knowledge management strategy under development l Common look and feel -- launch of toolkit l Branding strategy l Innovative GOL supply arrangements l Ongoing engagement with key client groups -- establish external advisory panel (GOLAP) l Strong network among departmental GOL leads …must be available to support departments 21

INVESTMENT 22 INVESTMENT 22

Strategic investments in GOL and Service Delivery 72 m Service Delivery ($357 million) $4 Strategic investments in GOL and Service Delivery 72 m Service Delivery ($357 million) $4 $3 57 m $51 m $880 Million in central funding over 6 fiscal years (to 2005 -06) to leverage investments made by departments Common Secure Infrastructure ($472 million) Policy, HR and Communications and Measurement ($51 million) 23

GOL Investment by Component (%) 24 GOL Investment by Component (%) 24

PROJECTS 25 PROJECTS 25

Overall Composition of GOL 3 Funded Service Visions Gateways / Clusters 38 funded projects, Overall Composition of GOL 3 Funded Service Visions Gateways / Clusters 38 funded projects, 28 remain funded centrally 130 most commonly used services, 45 complete Profile of GOL Services No. of Services Informational Services No. of Services Transactional Services On-Line Service Delivery Projects 92 funded projects, 22 remain active of which: 8 are new Catalytic Projects and One special IM investment for MGI from which a number of projects will derive 26

Types of GOL Pathfinders Sought From July 31, 2000 Call Letter: · Cross-departmental clustering Types of GOL Pathfinders Sought From July 31, 2000 Call Letter: · Cross-departmental clustering initiatives focussed on providing better targeted, more streamlined services to citizens, businesses, or international clients · Initiatives that address horizontal policy issues such as human resources development, change management, information management, public access, content development, and service transformation · Innovative or pioneering initiatives that break new ground and help transform program and services delivery in an on-line environment 27

GOL Pathfinder Selection Process Interdepartmental review · · Five teams of four members (from GOL Pathfinder Selection Process Interdepartmental review · · Five teams of four members (from TIMS departments) each reviewed approximately 30 submissions Every submission rated from 0 -5 against six criteria: · · · Reaches a large number of Canadians Advances the government’s top priorities Significantly enhances the critical mass of government services on-line Achieves demonstrable results, with potential for early deliverables suitable for showcasing Demonstrates best practices, universality or applicability to other departments or agencies Provides significant tangible evidence of improved client access to government programs and services with a measurable improvement in the level and quality of services 28

Accomplishments 2000 -012003 -04 – Projects l Funded a total of 133 projects: – Accomplishments 2000 -012003 -04 – Projects l Funded a total of 133 projects: – 92 On-Line Service Delivery Projects including: • 8 Business Cases • 9 Catalytic Projects • 1 special initiative for implementation of MGI Policy – – l 3 Service Visions: Canadian, Business and International 38 Gateway and Cluster projects including Canada Site and Common Tools Of these 80 projects have been closed out 29

Accomplishments - GOL Funded Projects (Pathfinders) funded over 2000 -2002: – – – Cross-departmental Accomplishments - GOL Funded Projects (Pathfinders) funded over 2000 -2002: – – – Cross-departmental clustering initiatives Initiatives addressing horizontal policy issues Innovative or pioneering initiatives What we got: l l l Canada Site, 3 Gateways, and 7 Clusters 15 major service transformation projects that gave visible momentum to GOL, tackled key security and privacy issues, addresses business and citizen priorities 1 community-based application enabling cross-jurisdictional cooperation (Access. ca) Results: l l All gateways and clusters still active projects Service Transformation projects: 3 progressed towards horizontal solutions over the years (e. g. EI-Appli Web, ROE, SSDUE); 2 negotiated scope change (Electronic Supply Chain, Passport On-Line) 30

Accomplishments - GOL Funded Projects funded in FY 2001 -2002: l l l Key Accomplishments - GOL Funded Projects funded in FY 2001 -2002: l l l Key transactional services: Proposals that accelerate on-line delivery of transactional services having a large volume of clients or significant volume of transactions Subject Clusters/Information Services: Proposals that build on Gateways and Clusters Blueprint and priorities; involve cross-departmental collaboration Pilots: Proposals to test concepts related to cross-jurisdictional service delivery, cross-channel management or innovative service transformation What we got: l 18 Clusters; 23 Key transaction services; 14 Pilots Results: l l l 16 of 18 funded Clusters received funding in subsequent years More than half of the Key Transactional Services continued to be funded as Accelerated Service Delivery Projects Pilot funding helped services progress towards departmentally funded electronic delivery (e. g. NUANS, EALS, OSBEFI) 31

Accomplishments - GOL Funded Projects funded over 2002 -2006 (includes current and future activities): Accomplishments - GOL Funded Projects funded over 2002 -2006 (includes current and future activities): l Maintain momentum on most commonly used services (Top 40 services) which are were already launched as pathfinders projects l Complete common/horizontal service pathfinders which benefit many departments l Support joining-up of services to improve responsiveness to client needs, service quality and delivery efficiency l Provide seed funding for Business Cases to explore new ideas l Develop Service Visions for Canadians, Businesses and International Clients l Realize the Service Visions and drive transformation via funding of Catalytic Projects l Align with Cluster Blueprint Validation Study l Take advantage of efficiencies within gateways l Establish Common Support and Tools for Gateways and Clusters 32

Accomplishments - GOL Funded Projects funded over 2002 -2006 (includes current and future activities): Accomplishments - GOL Funded Projects funded over 2002 -2006 (includes current and future activities): (Con’t) What we got: On-Line Service Delivery Projects (OLSD): – 36 Accelerated Service Delivery (ASD) Projects including 8 Business Cases – 9 Catalytic Projects – Management of Government Information Implementation ($6 M) Gateways and Clusters (G/C) – Canada Site and 3 Gateways – 24 Clusters – 8 Common Support and Tools 33

Accomplishments - GOL Funded Projects funded over 2002 -2006 (includes current and future activities): Accomplishments - GOL Funded Projects funded over 2002 -2006 (includes current and future activities): (Con’t) Results (as of end of 2003 -04): • Most ASD projects completed; 22 on-going ASD projects over 2004 -05 and 2005 -06 • Majority of Gateways and Clusters still active projects moving forward to long term positioning for Go. C Internet presence • Greater focus on Common Support and Tools for Gateways and Clusters to promote shared and integrated solutions • Service Visions defined and Catalytic projects supporting those Visions currently in progress • Special fund allocated to promote/advance the implementation of the new MGI Policy 34

Purpose of 2002 Departmental GOL Reports l l Provide an update of departmental service Purpose of 2002 Departmental GOL Reports l l Provide an update of departmental service plans in light of new 2005 target Assist in development of GOL end-state – define what success will look like – l Establish a baseline against which we can measure progress in future years – l E. g. , what clients will be able to do on-line by 2005, what level of functionality these services will have, how accessible they will be Alignment of template questions with performance indicators Identify further opportunities for clustering and service integration 35

Progression Model: Tracking Service Maturity l l l New reporting tool is based on Progression Model: Tracking Service Maturity l l l New reporting tool is based on Accenture three-stage model to measure functionality of services – Key assumption: targets vary – not all services expected to progress to the highest stage to be considered “complete” TBS has worked with other departments and agencies to refine model – Innovative approach – Effective for both information and transaction services New reporting tool standardizes GOL reporting – Departmental self-assessment of current status and 2005 target – Alignment of targets with client expectations – Consistent and understandable way of tracking and communicating progress 36

Service Progression Model used to measure developments l Progress model for transaction services: 1. Service Progression Model used to measure developments l Progress model for transaction services: 1. 2. 3. l Publish (1 -3; passive/passive)… information about the service is available on-line Interact (4 -6; active/passive)… clients can communicate on-line with government Transact (7 -9; active/active)… clients can complete a transaction on-line (clients and government can communicate with one another) Progress model for information services: 1. 2. 3. Publish (1 -3; push)… basic information is available on-line Customize (4 -6; push/pull)… information is deeper, increasingly client-centred; holdings are increasingly interactive Provide client-defined access (7 -9; pull)… clients can increasingly manipulate/synthesise different information 37

ORGANIZATIONAL READINESS Public Works and Travaux publics et Government Services gouvernementaux Canada ORGANIZATIONAL READINESS Public Works and Travaux publics et Government Services gouvernementaux Canada

The Organizational Readiness Office enabling a Whole-of-Government Approach The Organizational Readiness Office (ORO) is The Organizational Readiness Office enabling a Whole-of-Government Approach The Organizational Readiness Office (ORO) is a strategic unit that leads horizontal initiatives to improve capacity, agility and the management of human capital in the Public Service, working through the Information Technology (IT), Information Management (IM) and Service Delivery (SD) Communities. 39

Organizational Readiness Office Supporting Enterprise Management l l Established November, 2000 Directly enables implementation Organizational Readiness Office Supporting Enterprise Management l l Established November, 2000 Directly enables implementation of Government On-Line and Service Improvement Initiatives – major horizontal change agendas – three communities critical to success of GOL and SII – Communities complement departmental initiatives Leveraging strengths of both formal organizational structures and of informal community networks Leadership from Senior Level Champions Committees 40

Organizational Readiness Office Supporting Culture Change l Effectively communicate “Vision” of the business of Organizational Readiness Office Supporting Culture Change l Effectively communicate “Vision” of the business of government in modern society l Maintain shared understanding of “business process of Government” and of individual and organizational roles throughout PS l Increase and develop leadership and expertise-based capacity at all levels of the PS l Reinforce initiative, leadership, dedication to public service, and respect for PS values 41

…and identified key competencies l Strategies for change in human resources w Support development …and identified key competencies l Strategies for change in human resources w Support development of communities of practice for IT, IM and Service Delivery w Focus on capacity-building, recruitment, retention and reskilling w Develop and share community initiatives, management and work practices w e-learning resources w Shared work descriptions and competency profiles w Organizational modelling l GOL is key to modernizing public service, attracting the best and brightest 42

COMMUNICATIONS 43 COMMUNICATIONS 43

Example Communication Plan Outline Government On-Line/ Service On-Line Services Internal Communications (within P. S. Example Communication Plan Outline Government On-Line/ Service On-Line Services Internal Communications (within P. S. ) External Communications / Outreach Build Trust Promote On-line Services / Multi. Channel Objective Maintain momentum on GOL/ Service Agenda to departments Objective Communicating plans and reporting on progress / engaging Ministers - Parliamentarians Objective Build confidence of users by informing them of privacy and security measures Objective Promote & encourage use of Go. C on-line services; Promote choice Partners -Other Gov’t Depts (that, in turn, will share material/messages internally) Partners - GOL Departments Audiences -Department Heads - Public Servants - DGs of Communication Products -Key Messages -MP Kits -Info-sessions -Presentations Audiences Ministers / Parliamentarians -Media -OGDs -International -Canadians Products - Public Reports (GOL & Deptal) -Key Messages -presentations Partners -Secure Channel / GTIS -Gateways & Departments -CSE / OCIPEP -TBS Policy (GOL/GOS) Audiences -Public -Media -Parliamentarians -Public Servants Products -Security & Privacy brochures -Key Messages -Web site for Cdns ? Partners -Comm. Canada -Gateways/Clusters -GOL Departments -DGs of Comm. -Privy Council Office Audiences -Public -Media -Public Servants Products -Common Marketing Strategy & Guidelines: Framework for promotion of services by Gateways & Clusters; Training Materials; Generic brochures; MP kits 44

Public opinion research and reporting our progress to Canadians l Extensive and on-going Public Public opinion research and reporting our progress to Canadians l Extensive and on-going Public Opinion Research (POR) w w l Through Internet-based panel and traditional methods (focus groups and surveys by phone and in-person) Determine citizens’ priorities and expectations and guide the implementation of GOL Over 20, 000 Canadians participated in POR Topics cover priorities for on-line service delivery and service improvement as well as key issues (privacy and security) Reporting to Canadians and Parliamentarians w w w Annual GOL Report tabled in Parliament in June 2003 and posted to the Web – based on departmental public reports Annual Report to ICA (International Council for Information Technology in Government Administration) tabled in September 2003 Final GOL Advisory Panel Report – December 2003 Performance measurement report – Winter 2004 Next Annual GOL Report – April 2004 45

Examples of Communications Opportunities þ þ þ þ þ Internal and external presentations (e. Examples of Communications Opportunities þ þ þ þ þ Internal and external presentations (e. g. TIMS, OGD, stakeholders) International presentations Presentation to DGs of Communications Speeches by Minister(s) and Clerk to cabinet and external GOL background papers Publications on the internal & external GOL websites The redesigned Canada Site was supported by a national television advertising campaign that resulted in a 30% increase in visitors to the site. Annual GOL Overview Reports Press releases & media interviews The issues that have the attention of citizens - health care, education, child poverty and the economy - provide a favourable environment for positioning on-line services since better service is seen as part of the answer to dealing with these public priorities. 46

Defining a government-wide approach to service transformation l Client-centric service visions for Canadians, Business Defining a government-wide approach to service transformation l Client-centric service visions for Canadians, Business and International clients, addressing: – – – l Common frameworks – l l Service offerings based on client and improving services Service delivery (all channels) based on client preferences and efficiencies Service outcomes: improving effectiveness Consistent conceptual approach to offerings - outcomes, maturity model, client segmentation • Some key difference among clients Key catalytic initiatives to provide momentum for transformation Common enablers across all visions to reinforce government-wide approach 47

ti o n Common service outcomes – the service maturity model , for business ti o n Common service outcomes – the service maturity model , for business d Mature Delivery if “What if” f Increased capability / accessibility e Advanced search r capabilities Compliance Contextualized Bundled e Facilitated requirements / info / transactions / Compliance n info organized Anticipatory help Customized ti from citizen out information a Consistent basic End to end Bundled services / Integrated ti services across service delivery / End to end Service channels and self-service, solutions Delivery o access points generic solutions n o Multi-channel Program Bundled Programs Simplified offerings/progra personalization f programs m offers O ff Continuous learning Voice Valued Citizens and e and Business / Citizens/Clients Businesses in Relationships services exchange ri and for Business Context n Outcome Area Online Presence/ Basic Capability Service Availability Ease of access Personalized and navigation bundled access Service Transformation “Harmonized content” “SMART Regulations” / Informed decision making “Seamless Delivery” / “Seamless Solutions” “Breakthrough Programs” / “SMART Programs” e. Government, e. Democracy e. Diplomacy 48

d C o Common enablers - the service maturity model m m o Online d C o Common enablers - the service maturity model m m o Online Presence/ Capability Area Service Availability n Mature Delivery Basic Capability al Separate IM approaches Content management Common taxonomy and Information itmetadata across partners Management y. Common IM o. Integration of systems Departmental / Agency Interaction across Back Office Systems departments / f Interoperability E Contact centre Personalization across Client segmentation, Customer management integrated networks, co- nanalytics capability, case Relationship browsing, outbound Management amanagement marketing Common Business Number b Single use infrastructure Infrastructure (e. g. li. Business logic and back. Authentication and end integration secure channel) certification n Program and channel Leverage assets – e. g BG, g. Rationalized points of Presence focus CBSC, Service Canada, CAP presence C and Canada. gc. ca a Departmental processes Interoperability Integrated, cross. Business Processes Common service standards pjurisdictional processes Service Levels Zachman framework a. Zachman framework Program focused Relationship management b. Client-centric, HR and Culture Agreements Integrated channel working Leverage best practices, ili environment continuous learning Alliances ti. Partnerships e. Rationalize policies Point evolution, remove Policy and Legislation Limiting Departmental funding barriers se. Consultation Co-funding Shared funding Service Transformation Shared knowledge base Shared services Client management, best practices, Shared service Shared points of presence with integrated channels across levels Transformational process management, process excellence Empowered knowledge workers, multi-skilled Teamwork, expanded roles Networks, org realignment Enabling e. Democracy Shared risks, rewards 49

Business transformation enablement strategies l A common language and approach for business and technology Business transformation enablement strategies l A common language and approach for business and technology design, implementation and operation l Formal methods for the design and development of business and information systems (IS) processes l Business transformation and IS strategies l Reusable federated designs, components and implementation approaches for use by all programs l IS policies and standards l A federated governance process 50

Transforming Towards Interjurisdictional Integration l GOL is laying a foundation for service transformation: – Transforming Towards Interjurisdictional Integration l GOL is laying a foundation for service transformation: – – – l Common infrastructure to support integrated service delivery Critical mass of on-line services Trusted identification of clients But to achieve truly client-centric and whole-of-government approach, and fully capture the efficiency gains possible, we need to move: – – – beyond standalone department services to integrated offerings and reengineered business processes and administrative systems from siloed to networked IT security from federal to interjurisdictional integration 51

Why work interjurisdictionally? Citizens l want seamless services and service delivery – common counters, Why work interjurisdictionally? Citizens l want seamless services and service delivery – common counters, call centres or web sites l they don’t understand which level of government offers which service, nor do they want to. l 85% agree that the federal government should partner with provinces, territories and municipalities to integrate services (GOL Internet Research Panel, 2003 -04, Part One). Governments l shared systems, databases and business processes means lower cost per transaction; more jurisdictions working together = more cost avoidance or savings 52

Life events of a citizen School Birth Death Work Low Income Pensioner Sickness Citizen Life events of a citizen School Birth Death Work Low Income Pensioner Sickness Citizen Retired Disability Maternity / Paternity Homeless Unemployed Volunteer 53

Circle of Life Benefits Child Tax Credit CPP Child Benefit SIN CPP Death Benefit Circle of Life Benefits Child Tax Credit CPP Child Benefit SIN CPP Death Benefit OAS Survivor Allowance OAS Allowance School Birth CPP Survivor Pension OAS - GIS Student Loan Education Savings Grant Student Loan Repayment Insurance Premium CPP Contribution Work Death Low Income Pensioner Sickness Citizen EI CPP Disability Tax Credit Retired Disability OAS Pension CPP Child Benefit Maternity Paternity Homeless CPP Pension Community Assistance Unemployed Employment Insurance Volunteer Employment Leave Child Tax Credit Grant Contribution EPB - Grant Contribution 54

The citizen’s perspective regarding federal and provincial (Québec) government services in the same areas. The citizen’s perspective regarding federal and provincial (Québec) government services in the same areas. Student Financial Assistance Program - Information Highway Fund Quebec Family Allowance Youth Solidarity Program School Financial Assistance for parents of triplets and quadruplets Child Tax Credit Birth Death Tax Credit Home Adaptations for Seniors Independence CPP child Benefit CPP Contribution CPP Death Benefit OAS Survivor Allowance CPP Survivor Pension Low Income Pensioner Citizen RRQ - RTR Community Assistance EPB - Grant Contribution Employment Insurance Volunteer Unemployed Low Rent Housing Legend Housing Allowance Federal Benefits/Programs Provincial Benefits/Programs Shelter Allowance Program Fuel Tax Refund for Public Carriers QPP - Child Benefit QPP-DSB CPP Disability Employment Leave Child Tax Credit OAS Allowance Homeless EI Disability Income Support for participants in an active job search-QU Help Relocation of persons with disabilities CPP Child Benefit OAS - GIS CPP Pension Sickness Disability Tax Credit OAS Pension Retired External Breast Forms Program Student Loan Repayment Insurance Premium Education Savings Grant Refundable Tax Credit Work Student Loan SIN RRQ - DTH - SVR Parental Wage Assistance Program Student loans and grants Family Tax Reduction Maternity / Paternity Care taking Respite Care Maternity Allowance Program DSB Benefits for Children with severe disabilities Medical Appliance & Device Programs Residential Adaptation for Assistance Program Income Support Employment Assistance Programs Rent Supplement Financial Assistance for homeowners exposed to radon 55

Government from the perspective of a business Copyrights Imports Exports Patents Customs Trademarks Spectrum Government from the perspective of a business Copyrights Imports Exports Patents Customs Trademarks Spectrum Intellectual Property Invoicing Import/ Export Permits & Licenses Hazardous Materials Vendors Bidding Citizen’s Business Registration Business Number Registration ROE Regulatory Filings Environmental Taxes Financial Assistance Grants/Loans Subsidy Programs GST Source Deductions Corporate Taxes 56

2005 – REACHING OUR GOAL 57 2005 – REACHING OUR GOAL 57

By 2005 - we will have 130 services on-line… l 85 services on-line for By 2005 - we will have 130 services on-line… l 85 services on-line for Canadians including: w My Tax Account: secure access to tax statements and ability to update personal tax returns w Family Benefits: streamlined provision of client tax information to provinces/territories for provincial income-tested programs w Real-time determination of eligibility for veterans benefits and claims processing, automatic enrollment for income-tested pension benefits w Application for and repayment of student loans l 34 for Business including: w Filing of corporate tax, GST and record of employment w Grants and contributions: e. g. high tech sector and aboriginal businesses w Export assistance services and permits for exports and imports of controlled goods w Income-based stabilization programs for farmers l 4 for international clients including: w Applications for Immigration and visitors w Secure, two-way electronic filing foreign investment review w On-line delivery of international development assistance l 7 Services not linked to a Gateway (i. e. are internal to government) 58

Results… Increasing traffic to sites NA 59 Results… Increasing traffic to sites NA 59

Results… Better service l Canadians can get a personalized list of potential Go. C Results… Better service l Canadians can get a personalized list of potential Go. C benefits by using the Benefits Finder diagnostic tool l Canadians can plan for retirement using the Canadian Retirement Income Calculator and identify home care services l Food and vehicle recalls and allergy alerts are found in one place on the Public Safety cluster l Using the Business Start-up Assistant entrepreneurs are guided through the steps for starting a business, or applying for loans l Non-Canadians now get a complete picture of going to Canada – information about Canada, visa and inoculation requirements, what to expect at the border, and how to apply for a GST refund l Registered clients can be automatically informed of all new government publications of interest from all clusters via a shared email notification system 60

Results… Some efficiencies achieved Some examples: l Consolidated cluster management – l Single management Results… Some efficiencies achieved Some examples: l Consolidated cluster management – l Single management team for Jobs / Workers and HR Management clusters has streamlined efforts, extended partnership network, reduced operating costs by 15% Collaborative development of content – – Business Start-Up and Doing Business with Canada clusters are leveraging shared solutions, eliminating duplication of effort and investment Exporting / Importing Cluster consolidates all trade-related information and services, reducing duplication of content and effort across several departments 61

We are on track for our 2005 online target … þ Our 130 services We are on track for our 2005 online target … þ Our 130 services are now on-line - moving to mature delivery level þ Secure Channel operational - all departments and agencies using SCNet þ Updated policy suite - Common Look and Feel (2000); Privacy Impact Assessment (2002); Management of Government Information (2003) þ Comprehensive measurement framework and assessment tools Annual public reports on progress and on-going consultations with Canadians Leadership programs and competencies for IT, IM and Service Delivery communities Identifying and addressing legislative barriers to integrated services and their delivery þ þ þ …and moving to mature delivery level 62

. . . a common platform – the Secure Channel… Secure services planned by . . . a common platform – the Secure Channel… Secure services planned by the end of 2005 l Authentication services – application of epass, digital signatures, encryption w l Needed for more than half of on-line transactional services, including: Canadian Pension Plan, applications for grants and contributions, individual and business taxes, Elections Canada online voter registration, passport services, public service recruitment Information management (e-forms, secure document delivery, web hosting) and network services (secure channel network, secure file transfer, secure messaging) w Needed for 7 out of every 10 on-line services 63

E-channel to Government of Canada DRAFT Citizens Businesses Visitors • • Federal Provincial Municipal E-channel to Government of Canada DRAFT Citizens Businesses Visitors • • Federal Provincial Municipal Business Typical GOL Services • Canada Site • Gateways • Clusters • EI on the Web • Census 2006 (surveys. . ) • E-consultation • Dep’t web sites(info) • Tax Filing Online • My Tax Account • Business Tax Account • Record of Employment • Address Change • Interactive Info Service • GOC Employee Services 64

LESSONS LEARNED 65 LESSONS LEARNED 65

Key Lessons we are learning from the Government On-Line initiative Demonstrating that the effective Key Lessons we are learning from the Government On-Line initiative Demonstrating that the effective use of information technologies for improving service delivery leads to: w More relevant and attentive government – services are better, faster, targeted and more convenient – clients are more satisfied w More effective government – services are better integrated and engineered, hence improved ability to achieve the desired objectives w More efficient government – lower costs for ongoing transactions, rapid response to policy changes w More open government – more attentive to citizens, more transparent, new partnerships with communities and the provinces ---------- Government On-Line ---------- On-line Presence Basic Service Capability Mature Service Delivery Service Transformation 66

Key Lessons we are learning from the Government On-Line initiative…cont’ w Clustering information and Key Lessons we are learning from the Government On-Line initiative…cont’ w Clustering information and services was the right starting point – Created momentum – quick, big win: w Made client-centric service delivery a reality w Began a culture change of working horizontally w Highlighted many horizontal issues, e. g. , governance, partnerships, metrics, content management, service standards w Highlighted transformation and clustering opportunities for integrated services w Next step is to move from information and services that are grouped together to those that fit together w Seizing transformation opportunities is difficult – tests partnerships and commitment to user-centred service 67

CHALLENGES l Capacity – know-how l Funding/sustainability l Interjurisdictional relationships and governance l Commitment CHALLENGES l Capacity – know-how l Funding/sustainability l Interjurisdictional relationships and governance l Commitment from all levels in government l Governance and accountability for integrated services and common enablers l “Moving to common” – consolidation of services and networks – business architecture, infrastructure, information systems, processes, etc. l Privacy and security 68

The way ahead w Always question what we do and how we do it The way ahead w Always question what we do and how we do it – citizen-centred approach w Who needs this service? Why? Where? And how? w How can we deliver this service more effectively? w Is government the most efficient provider for this service? w Rethink our internal structures to offer a single-window access to government services across jurisdictions: w Move beyond standalone department services to integrated offerings and reengineered business processes and administrative systems w Move from federal to inter-jurisdictional integration w Move from silo’d to networked information and security w Communicate our progress towards an integrated citizen-centered approach to service delivery: w Encourage take-up of self-serve options w Market our offer of convenient, fast, efficient services with secure on-line transactions and protection of personal information w Offer a channel choice and customisation – client relationship management 69

Changing services and their delivery for Canadians want: • A point of entry – Changing services and their delivery for Canadians want: • A point of entry – knowing where to start • Streamlined processes – simple forms and less “red tape”; having the services provided automatically rather than having to ask for them • Timely service – the number one factor that determines client satisfaction • Seamless service – an integrated way to interact with all departments and levels of government • Choice of channels – different people choose to access the same service through different (and often multiple) channels 70

Changing services and their delivery for individual Canadians: What we should aim for l Changing services and their delivery for individual Canadians: What we should aim for l Single point of contact – an integrated and more effectively distributed network of in-person storefronts, call centres and integrated Internet portals across three levels of government l Existing data used to identify individuals eligible for income tested entitlement benefits (eg – have benefits offered/provided directly upon reaching income, age or other status; income tax statements compiled by GOC and “validated” by individual) l Individuals apply for and access all government benefits and entitlements (and fulfill their obligations) through a single process l Individuals electronically access and “self-manage” the core data held by the Go. C about them – able to correct inaccurate or changing information, and allow for its reuse l Citizens encouraged to move to self-service channels where willing and able 71

Changing services and their delivery for business Businesses want: • Vertical integration – most Changing services and their delivery for business Businesses want: • Vertical integration – most business-government events involve 3 levels of government • Responsiveness – high volatility in business, need for services changes over time • “Time is money” – cost of compliance and timeliness of service affect productivity • Clear focal point for dealing with government • Inclusion of intermediaries – used by most businesses to deal with complexity and for value-added services 72

Changing services and their delivery for business: What we should aim for l Single Changing services and their delivery for business: What we should aim for l Single point of contact – an integrated and more effectively distributed network of in-person “storefronts”, call centres and Internet portals across three levels of government l A common identifier used across programs: consolidated accounting of interactions with government, updating of all tombstone information in one transaction, service offerings change over the lifecycle l A single website point to all regulations pertinent to the particular circumstances of the individual business l Start-ups able to electronically register and obtain all necessary permissions and licences in a single transaction l A single electronic filing of employer information serves needs of federal and provincial governments l Businesses intermediaries recognized electronically 73

The sustainability challenge l How do we sustain / continue to evolve gateways and The sustainability challenge l How do we sustain / continue to evolve gateways and clusters once GOL funding runs out? l Sustainability Proposal: Gateways and clusters become the core electronic face of government – – Departments and partners will fund gateways and clusters and reduce service offerings on departmental sites Gateways and clusters will directly align with service visions and become the vehicle for integrated electronic services Common tools will be funded and managed centrally The Go. C’s web presence will be managed through a coordinated governance and horizontal accountability framework 74

The new electronic face of government l Proposal: – Gateways and clusters should play The new electronic face of government l Proposal: – Gateways and clusters should play an increased role in on-line service delivery, becoming the primary points of access to information and services for individuals, SMEs, would-be entrepreneurs, and international clients – Gateways and clusters would be “retail arm” for information and programs created by departments and partners – aggregating content by subject or audience – Similar role for other interdepartmental Web sites 75

Benefits of this approach l Client-centricity as core principle and driver for evolution of Benefits of this approach l Client-centricity as core principle and driver for evolution of Web presence and on-line service delivery – Consistent with service visions – Foundation for inter-jurisdictional collaboration on “seamless” offerings l Horizontal, whole of government approach – Coherent evolution of Go. C Web presence: Go. C brand for high quality on-line service delivery – Defined scope and audiences for clusters will prevent duplication – Authoritative sources for information clusters to be established – Coordination across government will be needed to allow Cluster Blueprint to evolve over time 76

Proposed sustainability of gateways l Canada Site: Internalize all costs into A-base (department to Proposed sustainability of gateways l Canada Site: Internalize all costs into A-base (department to be confirmed) l Canadians Gateway: HRSD and SD to absorb maintenance costs of Canadians Gateway and five clusters l Business Gateway: IC to sustain the gateway using leverage from alignment with CBSCs l Non-Canadians Gateway: Central hosting of gateway and clusters will be absorbed by DFA Boards of directors model needed to provide crossgovernment managerial and financial direction for continued evolution 77

Why do we need a plan to accelerate take-up of the on-line channel? • Why do we need a plan to accelerate take-up of the on-line channel? • Improve service to clients through awareness and online functionality • Realize efficiencies, cost savings and opportunities for service transformation • Optimize investment w $880 M was allocated for central investment to: develop policy; accelerate the development of client-facing services; and develop common/enabling services (i. e. secure channel) • Continue momentum of the GOL Initiative w Commitment to deliver 130 most commonly used services by 2005 • Ensure a whole-of-government “enterprise” approach • Address OAG concerns 78

Key Challenges Client Readiness • Do the clients have access? • Do the clients Key Challenges Client Readiness • Do the clients have access? • Do the clients have the necessary skill set? Departmental Capacity • Are the back-end processes fully integrated? • Are departments equipped to handle additional volumes/load/traffic across all channels? • Are there dependencies on common tools / infrastructure/ secure channel? • Is staff aware of services, features, functionality? • Is management and staff fully prepared to actively promote the e-channel? Service Maturity • Are services sufficiently sophisticated (end-to-end) and integrated? • Are the services “user-friendly”? 79

Key Challenges (Continued) Scarce resources requires a selective approach • Targeting high volume transactional Key Challenges (Continued) Scarce resources requires a selective approach • Targeting high volume transactional services • Readiness of “Service Bundles” for specific client segments Time is of the essence, aligning leadership is essential to ensure • Timely decisions • Access to funding Reality of shrinking resources requires us to be strategic in our investments and actions 80

Reporting GOL progress w GOL overview report w 2002 report tabled in Parliament June Reporting GOL progress w GOL overview report w 2002 report tabled in Parliament June 2003 w 2003 report on GOL tabled in Parliament March 2004 w Government On-Line Advisory Panel w Final report December 2003 w Responding to Auditor General’s Report w February 2004 w Performance Measurement Report w First report Spring 2004 81

For more information www. canada. gc. ca www. gol-ged. gc. ca www. cio-dpi. gc. For more information www. canada. gc. ca www. gol-ged. gc. ca www. cio-dpi. gc. ca 82