QIM 501 Instructional Design and Delivery Cognitivism Theory

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QIM 501 Instructional Design and Delivery Cognitivism Theory by JEAN PIAGET Prepared by: Zaitun QIM 501 Instructional Design and Delivery Cognitivism Theory by JEAN PIAGET Prepared by: Zaitun binti Jasin P-QM 0039/10 Lecturer: Dr. Balakrishnan Muniandy

Definition of Cognitivism is a theory which attempts to answer how and why people Definition of Cognitivism is a theory which attempts to answer how and why people learn by attributing the process to cognitive activity. This theory followed the behaviorist school of thought. The cognitivists’ quarrel with the behaviorists was that their focus on observable behavior did not account for what was going on in the mind.

Biography Jean Piaget (1896 -1980) • Jean Piaget was born in Neuchatel (Switzerland) on Biography Jean Piaget (1896 -1980) • Jean Piaget was born in Neuchatel (Switzerland) on August 9, 1896. • He died in Geneva on September 16, 1980. • He was the oldest child of Arthur Piaget, professor of medieval literature at the University, and of Rebecca Jackson. • At age 11, while he was a pupil at Neuchatel Latin high school, he wrote a short notice on an albino sparrow. • This short paper is generally considered as the start of a brilliant scientific career made of over sixty books and several hundred articles.

Biography He studied natural sciences at the University of Neuchatel where he obtained a Biography He studied natural sciences at the University of Neuchatel where he obtained a Ph. D Studying various philosophers and the application of logic, he dedicated himself to finding a “biological explanation of knowledge. ” In 1918, Piaget received his Doctorate in Science from the University of Neuchatel. After 1921 Piaget was director of research, assistant director, and then codirector at the Jean Jacques Rousseau Institute, later part of Geneva University. He was chairman of the International Bureau of Education and was a Swiss delegate to United Nations Economic and Scientific Committee (UNESCO).

Introduction Piaget formally began a career that would have a profound impact on both Introduction Piaget formally began a career that would have a profound impact on both psychology and education. After working with Alfred Binet, Piaget developed an interest in the intellectual development of children. Based upon his observations, he concluded that children were not less intelligent than adults, they simply think differently. Albert Einstein called Piaget’s discovery “so simple only a genius could have thought of it. ” Piaget's stage theory describes the cognitive development of children. Cognitive development involves changes in cognitive process and abilities.

Key Concepts Schema Describes both the mental and physical actions involved in understanding and Key Concepts Schema Describes both the mental and physical actions involved in understanding and knowing. Schemas are categories of knowledge that help us to interpret and understand the world. In Piaget's view, a schema includes both a category of knowledge and the process of obtaining that knowledge. As experiences happen, this new information is used to modify, add to, or change previously existing schemas. Example : A child may have a schema about a type of animal, such as a cat. If the child's sole experience has been with small cats, a child might believe that all cats are small, furry, and have four legs. Suppose then that the child encounters a very large cat. The child will take in this new information, modifying the previously existing schema to include this new information.

Key Concepts Assimilation The process of taking in new information into our previously existing Key Concepts Assimilation The process of taking in new information into our previously existing schema’s is known as assimilation. The process is somewhat subjective, because we tend to modify experience or information somewhat to fit in with our preexisting beliefs. In the example above, seeing a cat and labeling it “cat" is an example of assimilating the animal into the child's cat schema.

Key Concepts Accommodation Another part of adaptation involves changing or altering our existing schemas Key Concepts Accommodation Another part of adaptation involves changing or altering our existing schemas in light of new information, a process known as accommodation. Accommodation involves altering existing schemas, or ideas, as a result of new information or new experiences. New schemas may also be developed during this process.

Key Concepts Equilibration Piaget believed that all children try to strike a balance between Key Concepts Equilibration Piaget believed that all children try to strike a balance between assimilation and accommodation, which is achieved through a mechanism Piaget called ‘equilibration’. As children progress through the stages of cognitive development, it is important to maintain a balance between applying previous knowledge (assimilation) and changing behavior to account for new knowledge (accommodation). Equilibration helps explain how children are able to move from one stage of thought into the next.

Stages of Cognitive Development Sensorimotor Stage (0 -2 years) During the sensorimotor stage, an Stages of Cognitive Development Sensorimotor Stage (0 -2 years) During the sensorimotor stage, an infant’s knowledge of the world is limited to their sensory perceptions and motor activities. Behaviors are limited to simple motor responses caused by sensory stimuli. Children utilize skills and abilities they were born with, such as looking, sucking, grasping, and listening, to learn more about the environment.

Stages of Cognitive Development Substages of the Sensorimotor Stage: 1) Reflexes (0 -1 month): Stages of Cognitive Development Substages of the Sensorimotor Stage: 1) Reflexes (0 -1 month): The child understands the environment purely through inborn reflexes such as sucking and looking. 2) Primary Circular Reactions (1 -4 months): Involves coordinating sensation and new schemas. For example, a child may such his or her thumb by accident and then later intentionally repeat the action. These actions are repeated because the infant finds them pleasurable.

Stages of Cognitive Development 3) Secondary Circular Reactions (4 -8 months): The child becomes Stages of Cognitive Development 3) Secondary Circular Reactions (4 -8 months): The child becomes more focused on the world and begins to intentionally repeat an action in order to trigger a response in the environment. For example, a child will purposefully pick up a toy in order to put it in his or her mouth.

Stages of Cognitive Development 4) Coordination of Reactions (8 -12 months): The child starts Stages of Cognitive Development 4) Coordination of Reactions (8 -12 months): The child starts to show clearly intentional actions. The child may also combine schemas in order to achieve a desired effect. Children begin exploring the environment around them and will often imitate the observed behavior of others. The understanding of objects also begins during this time and children begin to recognize certain objects as having specific qualities. For example, a child might realize that a rattle will make a sound when shaken.

Stages of Cognitive Development 5) Tertiary Circular Reactions (12 -18 months): Children begin a Stages of Cognitive Development 5) Tertiary Circular Reactions (12 -18 months): Children begin a period of trial-and-error experimentation during the fifth substage. For example, a child may try out different sounds or actions as a way of getting attention from a caregiver. 6) Early Representational Thought (18 -24 months): Children begin to develop symbols to represent events or objects in the world in the final sensorimotor substage. During this time, children begin to move towards understanding the world through mental operations rather than purely through actions.

Stages of Cognitive Development Preoperational Stage (2 -6 years) Language development is one of Stages of Cognitive Development Preoperational Stage (2 -6 years) Language development is one of the hallmarks of this period. Piaget noted that children in this stage do not yet understand concrete logic, cannot mentally manipulate information, and are unable to take the point of view of other people, which he termed egocentrism. Children also become increasingly adept at using symbols, as evidenced by the increase in playing and pretending. For example, a child is able to use an object to represent something else, such as pretending a broom is a horse. Role playing also becomes important during the preoperational stage. Children often play the roles of “mommy”, “daddy”, “doctor”, and many others.

Stages of Cognitive Development Concrete Operational Stage (7 -11 years) During this time, children Stages of Cognitive Development Concrete Operational Stage (7 -11 years) During this time, children gain a better understanding of mental operations. Children begin thinking logically about concrete events, but have difficulty understanding abstract or hypothetical concepts. Piaget determined that children in the concrete operational stage were fairly good at the use of inductive logic. Inductive logic involves going from a specific experience to a general principle. One of the most important developments in this stage is an understanding of ‘reversibility, ’ or awareness that actions can be reversed. An example of this is being able to reverse the order of relationships between mental categories. For example, a child might be able to recognize that his/her cat is a Tompok, that a Tompok is a cat, and that a cat is an animal.

Stages of Cognitive Development Formal Operational Stage (11 -15 years/adult) People develop the ability Stages of Cognitive Development Formal Operational Stage (11 -15 years/adult) People develop the ability to think about abstract concepts. Skills such as logical thought, deductive reasoning, and systematic planning also emerge during this stage. In earlier stages, children used trial-and-error to solve problems. Children at the formal operational stage of cognitive development are often able to quickly plan an organized approach to solving a problem.

Teaching and Learning Under the Cognitivist Theory Teachers should create an environment with lots Teaching and Learning Under the Cognitivist Theory Teachers should create an environment with lots of tools for developing an understanding of the topic. Teachers should monitor students progress and ask lots of questions. Teachers should provide use visual and verbal teaching methods. Teachers can read aloud to students. Using technology, they can provide pictures, videos, and charts to enhance learning (i. e. computer video clip, topic-related images from the web, etc. )

Teaching and Learning Under the Cognitivist Theory Students should think deeply and answer questions Teaching and Learning Under the Cognitivist Theory Students should think deeply and answer questions about the topic to further develop their understanding. Failure can be a good thing. It helps the student recognize that they need to learn more to achieve mastery of the topic.

Teaching and Learning Under the Cognitivist Theory Cognitivist theory is a great theory to Teaching and Learning Under the Cognitivist Theory Cognitivist theory is a great theory to follow when teaching. Its always a good idea to provide different ways of learning. Some students are visual learners and will do better learning through pictures, videos, or visually looking at a text book. Some students are audio learners and will do better listening to a lecture, or listening to a teacher read aloud to them. Some students are audio-visual learners and will do better with either technique!

Conclusion Cognitive development is the process whereby a child’s understanding of the world changes Conclusion Cognitive development is the process whereby a child’s understanding of the world changes as a function of age and experience. Children will provide different explanations of reality at different stages of cognitive development. Learning materials and activities should involve the appropriate level of motor or mental operations for a child of given age; avoid asking students to perform tasks that are beyond their currrent cognitive capabilities. Use teaching methods that actively involve students and present challenges. Important classroom principles from cognitive psychology include meaningful learning, organization, and elaboration.

References Advameg, Inc. (2010). Encyclopedia of World Biography: Jean Piaget. Retrieved from http: //www. References Advameg, Inc. (2010). Encyclopedia of World Biography: Jean Piaget. Retrieved from http: //www. notablebiographies. com/Pe-Pu/Piaget-Jean. html Boeree, C. G. (2006). Personality Theories: Jean Piaget. Retrieved from http: //webspace. ship. edu/cgboer/piaget. html Cherry, K. (2010). Background and Key Concepts of Piaget's Theory: Stages of Cognitive Development. Retrieved from http: //psychology. about. com/od/piagetstheory/a/keyconcepts. htm Cooper, S. (2009). Jean Piaget: Genetic Epistemology and Cognitive Constructivism. Retrieved from http: //www. lifecirclesinc. com/Learningtheories/constructivism/piaget. html Kearsley, G. (2009). Genetic Epistemology (J. Piaget). Retrieved from http: //tip. psychology. org/piaget. html Kodat, R. (2002). Jean Piaget's Theory of Cognitive Development. Retrieved from http: //www. essortment. com/all/jeanpiagettheo_rnrn. htm




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