Overview of User Interface Design Prototyping and Evaluation

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Overview of User Interface Design, Prototyping, and Evaluation (or, All of HCI in 80 Overview of User Interface Design, Prototyping, and Evaluation (or, All of HCI in 80 Minutes) Jason I. Hong January 19, 2006

User Interface Hall of Fame or Shame? • • IE 5 page setup for User Interface Hall of Fame or Shame? • • IE 5 page setup for printing Problems – codes for header & footer information • requires recall! • want recognition • no equivalent GUI – help is the way to find out, but not obvious

Overview of User Interface Design, Prototyping, and Evaluation (or, All of HCI in 80 Overview of User Interface Design, Prototyping, and Evaluation (or, All of HCI in 80 Minutes) Jason I. Hong January 19, 2006

Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) Human • – the end-user of a program – the others Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) Human • – the end-user of a program – the others in the organization • Computer – the machine the program runs on – clients & servers, PDAs, cars, microwaves • Interaction – the user tells the computer what they want – the computer communicates results (input) (output)

HCI Approach to UI Design Tasks Organizational & Social Issues Design Technology • Humans HCI Approach to UI Design Tasks Organizational & Social Issues Design Technology • Humans Other considerations we won’t look at – Business models, level of fun

Why is HCI Important? • • Major part of work for “real” programs (~50%) Why is HCI Important? • • Major part of work for “real” programs (~50%) Bad user interfaces cost: – money (reduced profits, call centers) • Wi. Fi Alliance: 30% of Wi. Fi boxes returned – reputation of organization (e. g. , brand loyalty) – time (wasted effort and energy by users, rework) – lives (Therac-25)

Why is HCI Important? • Privacy and Security – – • phishing scams accidental Why is HCI Important? • Privacy and Security – – • phishing scams accidental disclosures (ex. location info, cookies) difficulty diagnosing the situation (intrusion detection) intentionally circumventing security mechanisms User interfaces hard to get right – people are unpredictable – intuition of designers often wrong – need good design methods

Four Myths about Good Design • Myth 1: Only experts create good designs – Four Myths about Good Design • Myth 1: Only experts create good designs – experts faster, simple and effective techniques anyone can apply • Myth 2: We can fix the user interface at the end – good design is more than just user interface – having right features, building those features right • Myth 3: Good design takes too long / costs too much – simple and effective techniques that can reduce total development time & cost (finds problems early on) • Myth 4: Good design is just cool graphics – graphics part of bigger picture of what to communicate & how

Outline • Overview of the Design Process – Design – Prototyping – Evaluation • Outline • Overview of the Design Process – Design – Prototyping – Evaluation • User Models – Affordances – Mappings – Metaphors

Who Builds User Interfaces? • A team of specialists (ideally) – – – – Who Builds User Interfaces? • A team of specialists (ideally) – – – – – graphic designers interaction / interface designers information architects technical writers marketers test engineers usability engineers software engineers users

Design Prototype Evaluate Design Prototype Evaluate

Design • Design is driven by requirements – focus on the core need – Design • Design is driven by requirements – focus on the core need – not how it is to be implemented – e. g. , PDA not as important as “mobile” app. • might be multiple ways of achieving your goals • A design is a simplified representation of the desired artifact – for UIs these representations include • text description of tasks • screen sketches or storyboards • flow diagrams / outline showing task structure • executable prototypes Write essay start word processor write outline fill outline Start word processor find word processor icon double click on icon Write outline write down high-level ideas . . .

Web Design Representations Site Maps Schematics Storyboards Mock-ups Web Design Representations Site Maps Schematics Storyboards Mock-ups

Usability Goals? According to the ISO: The effectiveness, efficiency, and satisfaction with which specified Usability Goals? According to the ISO: The effectiveness, efficiency, and satisfaction with which specified users achieve specified goals in particular environments • This does not mean you have to create a “dry” design or something that is only good for novices – it all depends on your goals

Usability Goals • • • Set goals early & later use to measure progress Usability Goals • • • Set goals early & later use to measure progress Goals often have tradeoffs, so prioritize Example goals: – Learnable • faster the 2 nd time & so on – Memorable • from session to session – Flexible • multiple ways to accomplish tasks – Efficient • perform tasks quickly – Robust • minimal error rates • good feedback so user can recover – Pleasing • high user satisfaction – Fun

User-centered Design • Cognitive abilities – perception – physical manipulation – memory • Organizational User-centered Design • Cognitive abilities – perception – physical manipulation – memory • Organizational / job abilities

User-centered Design • You already know too much User-centered Design • You already know too much

User-centered Design • You already know too much – Easy to think of self User-centered Design • You already know too much – Easy to think of self as typical user – Easy to make mistaken assumptions • Keep users involved throughout the design – understanding work process – getting constant feedback • User-centered design mind-set – thinking of the world in users’ terms (empathy) – not technology-centered / feature driven, think of benefit to users

Outline • Overview of the Design Process – Design – Prototyping – Evaluation • Outline • Overview of the Design Process – Design – Prototyping – Evaluation • User Models – Affordances – Mappings – Metaphors

Example of Design Failure • BART “Charge-a-Ticket” Machines – allow riders to buy BART Example of Design Failure • BART “Charge-a-Ticket” Machines – allow riders to buy BART tickets or add fare – takes ATM cards, credit cards, & cash

Example of Design Failure • BART “Charge-a-Ticket” Machines – allow riders to buy BART Example of Design Failure • BART “Charge-a-Ticket” Machines – allow riders to buy BART tickets or add fare – takes ATM cards, credit cards, & cash • Problems (? ) – no visual flow (Where do I start? Where do I go next? ) – one “path” of operation • ticket type -> payment -> ticket – BART Plus has minimum of $28, no indication of this until after inserting >= $1 • can’t switch to regular BART ticket – too many instructions – large dismiss transaction button does nothing

Lessons from the BART machine • Can’t we just define “good” interfaces? – “good” Lessons from the BART machine • Can’t we just define “good” interfaces? – “good” has to be taken in context of users • might be acceptable for office work, not for play • infinite variety of tasks and users – guidelines are too vague to be generative • e. g. , “give adequate feedback” • How can we avoid similar results? – “What is required to perform the user’s tasks? ”

Task Analysis • Find out: – who users are – what tasks they need Task Analysis • Find out: – who users are – what tasks they need to perform • Observe existing work practices Create scenarios of actual use • This lets us try new ideas before building software! • – Get rid of problems early in the design process while they are still cheap to fix!

Task Analysis Questions • • • Task Analysis Who is going to use the Task Analysis Questions • • • Task Analysis Who is going to use the system? What tasks do they now perform? What tasks are desired? How are the tasks learned? Where are the tasks performed? What’s the relationship between user & data?

Task Analysis Questions (cont. ) • • • What other tools does the user Task Analysis Questions (cont. ) • • • What other tools does the user have? How do users communicate with each other? How often are the tasks performed? What are the time constraints on the tasks? What happens when things go wrong?

Who? • Identity – in-house or specific customer is easy – need several typical Who? • Identity – in-house or specific customer is easy – need several typical users for broad product • • Background Skills Work habits and preferences Physical characteristics – height?

Who (BART)? • Identity? – people who ride BART • • • business people, Who (BART)? • Identity? – people who ride BART • • • business people, students, disabled, elderly, tourists Background? – may have an ATM or credit card – have used other fare machines before Skills? – may know how to put cards into ATM – know how to buy BART tickets

Who (BART cont. )? • Work habits and preferences? – Some people: use BART Who (BART cont. )? • Work habits and preferences? – Some people: use BART 5 days a week – Others: first time use • Physical characteristics? – varying heights -> don’t make it too high or too low!

What Tasks? • • • Important for both automation and new functionality Understand relative What Tasks? • • • Important for both automation and new functionality Understand relative importance of tasks Example: on-line billing – small dentists office had billing automated – assistants were unhappy with new system – old forms contained hand-written margin notes • e. g. , patient A’s insurance takes longer than most, etc.

Where is the Task Performed? • • Office, laboratory, point of sale? Effects of Where is the Task Performed? • • Office, laboratory, point of sale? Effects of environment on users? Users under stress? Confidentiality required? Wet, dirty, or slippery hands? Soft drinks? Lighting? Noise?

What is the Relationship Between Users & Data? • Public data? – Open government What is the Relationship Between Users & Data? • Public data? – Open government records, public web sites • Personal data? – Ex. health records, bank records – always accessed at same machine? – do users move between machines? • Common data? – used concurrently? – passed sequentially between users? • • Remote access required? Access to data restricted?

What Other Tools Does the User Have? • More than just compatibility How user What Other Tools Does the User Have? • More than just compatibility How user works with collection of tools get things done • Example: automating lab data collection • – – – how is data collected now? by what instruments and manual procedures? how is the information analyzed? are the results transcribed for records or publication? what media/forms are used and how are they handled? to

How Often Do Users Perform the Tasks? • • Frequent users remember more details How Often Do Users Perform the Tasks? • • Frequent users remember more details Infrequent users may need more help – even for simple operations – make these tasks possible to do • Which function is performed – most frequently? – by which users? – optimizing system for these tasks will improve perception of good performance

What Happens When Things Go Wrong? • How do people deal with – task-related What Happens When Things Go Wrong? • How do people deal with – task-related errors? – practical difficulties? – catastrophes? • Is there a backup strategy?

Involve Users to Answer Task Analysis Questions • Users help designers learn: – what Involve Users to Answer Task Analysis Questions • Users help designers learn: – what is involved in their jobs – what tools they use – i. e. , what they do and how they do it • Developers reveal technical capabilities – builds rapport & an idea of what is possible – user’s can comment on whether ideas make sense • How do we do this? – observe & interview prospective users in work place!

 • Heated arguments with others on design team – Over what tools, skills, • Heated arguments with others on design team – Over what tools, skills, and knowledge users have – These tend to generate lots of heat, little light • Go out to real users and get real data from them – find out what they really do – how would your system fit in • Are they too busy? – buy their time (t-shirts, coffee mugs) – find substitutes (medical students)

Can’t we just ask users what they want? • • Not familiar with what Can’t we just ask users what they want? • • Not familiar with what is possible with technology Not familiar with design constraints – Budget, legacy code, time, etc • • • Not familiar with good design Not familiar with security and privacy Sometimes users don’t know what they want – Ex. Remote controls • Contextual inquiry is an important method for understanding users’ needs – Also, attitude vs actual behavior

Contextual Inquiry • • • Go to the workplace & see the work as Contextual Inquiry • • • Go to the workplace & see the work as it unfolds People summarize, but we want details Keep it concrete when people start to abstract – “We usually get reports by email”, ask “Can I see one? ”

Contextual Inquiry • • Facts are only the starting point, you want a design Contextual Inquiry • • Facts are only the starting point, you want a design based on correct interpretations Validate & rephrase – share interpretations to check your reasoning • Ex. “So accountability means a paper trail? ” – people will be uncomfortable until the phrasing is right

Conducting a Contextual Inquiry • Use recording technologies – notebooks, tape recorders, still & Conducting a Contextual Inquiry • Use recording technologies – notebooks, tape recorders, still & video cameras • Structure – conventional interview (15 minutes) • introduce focus & deal with ethical issues • get used to each other by getting summary data – transition (30 seconds) • state new rules – they work while you watch & interrupt – contextual interview (1 -2 hours) • take notes, draw, be nosy! (“who was on the phone? ”) – wrap-up (15 minutes) • summarize your notes & confirm what is important

Using the Data You Learn • Say who the users are (use personas or Using the Data You Learn • Say who the users are (use personas or profiles)

Example Persona Name: Patricia Age: 31 Occupation: Sales Manager, IKEA Store Hobbies: Painting Fitness/biking Example Persona Name: Patricia Age: 31 Occupation: Sales Manager, IKEA Store Hobbies: Painting Fitness/biking Taking son Devon to the park Likes: Emailing friends & family Surprises for her husband Talking on cell phone with friends Top 40 radio stations Eating Thai food Going to sleep late Dislikes: Slow service at checkout lines Smokers

Using the Data You Learn • Say who the users are (use personas or Using the Data You Learn • Say who the users are (use personas or profiles) – personas do not have to be a real person, but should be based on real facts and details – design can really differ depending on who the target is – provide names (easier to reference) – characteristics of the users (job, expertise, etc. ) • Might have one persona for each class of users – helps the design team think in terms of the users • Keep in mind we already use personas – “I wouldn’t like that” – “My mom wouldn’t be able to use that”

Selecting Tasks • • Choose real tasks users face Have a mixture of simple Selecting Tasks • • Choose real tasks users face Have a mixture of simple & complex tasks – easy tasks (common or introductory) – moderate tasks – difficult tasks (infrequent or for power users) • Good tasks are fundamental to good usability – does your system support key tasks desired by users? – how well does your system support these? – we’ll see more of tasks in evaluation

Using Tasks in Design • Write up a description of tasks – formally or Using Tasks in Design • Write up a description of tasks – formally or informally – run by users and rest of the design team • do they make sense? realistic? – get more information where needed Manny is in the city at a club and would like to call his girlfriend, Sherry, to see when she will be arriving at the club. She called from a friend’s house while he was driving, so he couldn’t answer the phone. He would like to check his missed calls and find the number so that he can call her back.

Using Tasks in Design (contd. ) • Okay to have some freeform tasks – Using Tasks in Design (contd. ) • Okay to have some freeform tasks – Ex: “purchase tickets for a movie you want to see” • navigation, reviews, shopping cart, etc – specific tasks good for understanding usability, freeform tasks good for understanding usefulness

Outline • Overview of the Design Process – Design – Prototyping – Evaluation • Outline • Overview of the Design Process – Design – Prototyping – Evaluation • User Models – Affordances – Mappings – Metaphors

Why Do We Prototype? • • Quickly experiment with alternative designs Get feedback on Why Do We Prototype? • • Quickly experiment with alternative designs Get feedback on our design faster – fix problems before code is written – saves time and money • Keep the design centered on the user – must test & observe ideas with users

Fidelity in Prototyping • • Fidelity refers to level of detail High fidelity – Fidelity in Prototyping • • Fidelity refers to level of detail High fidelity – prototype looks like the final product • Low fidelity – artist’s rendition with many details missing

Low-fi Sketches & Storyboards Low-fi Sketches & Storyboards

Low-fi Sketches & Storyboards Low-fi Sketches & Storyboards

Ink Chat Ink Chat

Why Use Low-fi Prototypes? • Traditional methods take too long – sketches build prototype Why Use Low-fi Prototypes? • Traditional methods take too long – sketches build prototype evaluate iterate – don’t want to program for weeks or months before feedback • Simulate the prototype – sketches evaluate iterate – sketches act as prototypes • designer “plays computer” • other design team members observe & record • Kindergarten implementation skills – allows non-programmers to participate – helps make sure everyone on the team is together

Qualities of Lo-Fi Prototypes Informal visual representation • – – • communicates “unfinished” encourages Qualities of Lo-Fi Prototypes Informal visual representation • – – • communicates “unfinished” encourages creativity faster to create higher-level feedback • Formal visual representation – communicates “finished” – inhibits creativity (detailing) – slower to create Advice: avoid high-fidelity tools until necessary

The Basic Materials • • Large, heavy, white paper (11 x 17) 5 x The Basic Materials • • Large, heavy, white paper (11 x 17) 5 x 8 in. index cards Post-its Tape, stick glue, correction tape Pens & markers (many colors & sizes) Overhead transparencies Scissors, X-acto knives, etc.

ESP ESP

Constructing the Model Constructing the Model

Constructing the Paper Prototype • Set a deadline – a few hours or 1 Constructing the Paper Prototype • Set a deadline – a few hours or 1 -2 days – don’t think for too long - build it! • • Draw a window frame on large paper Put different screen regions on cards – anything that moves, changes, appears/disappears • Ready response for any user action – e. g. , have those pull-down menus already made • Use photocopier to make many versions

Advantages of Low-fi Prototyping • Takes only a few hours – no expensive equipment Advantages of Low-fi Prototyping • Takes only a few hours – no expensive equipment needed • Can test multiple alternatives – fast iterations • number of iterations is tied to final quality • Almost all interaction can be faked

1 Minute Break • Good design matters in all areas of our lives • 1 Minute Break • Good design matters in all areas of our lives • The little things really do matter • A designer’s proposed changes to airport screenings

Outline • Overview of the Design Process – Design – Prototyping – Evaluation • Outline • Overview of the Design Process – Design – Prototyping – Evaluation • A lot here applies to evaluating both paper prototypes and real systems • User Models – Affordances – Mappings – Metaphors

Preparing for a Test • Select people representative of target users – minimize use Preparing for a Test • Select people representative of target users – minimize use friends or family – job-specific vocab / knowledge – approximate if needed • medical students, engineering students – use incentives to get participants • Prepare scenarios that are – typical of the product during actual use – ideally, your defined tasks from beforehand • Practice to avoid “bugs”

Conducting a Test • Roles: – greeter – puts users at ease & gets Conducting a Test • Roles: – greeter – puts users at ease & gets demographic data – facilitator – only team member who speaks • gives instructions & encourages thoughts, opinions – computer – simulates response, w/o explanation – observers – take notes & recommendations • Typical session is 1 hour – preparation, the test, debriefing • Make a recording or take good notes

Instructions to Participants • Describe the purpose of the evaluation – “I’m testing the Instructions to Participants • Describe the purpose of the evaluation – “I’m testing the product; I’m not testing you” • • • Tell them they can quit at any time Demonstrate any equipment Explain how to think aloud – tell us what they are trying to do – tell us questions that arise as they work – tell us things they read • • • Explain that you will not provide help Explain the basic concept of the UI, but not too much Describe the task – give written instructions, one task at a time

Conducting a Test • Do a debriefing at the end – Were tasks realistic? Conducting a Test • Do a debriefing at the end – Were tasks realistic? – What parts made sense? Confusing? – Any features missing?

Ethical Considerations • Sometimes tests can be distressing – users have left in tears Ethical Considerations • Sometimes tests can be distressing – users have left in tears • You have a responsibility to alleviate – – – • make voluntary with informed consent avoid pressure to participate let them know they can stop at any time stress that you are testing the system, not them make collected data as anonymous as possible Often must get human subjects approval (IRB)

Deciding on Data to Collect • Two types of data – process data • Deciding on Data to Collect • Two types of data – process data • observations of what users are doing & thinking – bottom-line data • summary of what happened (time, errors, success) • independent and dependent variables

Which Type of Data to Collect? • Always focus on process data first – Which Type of Data to Collect? • Always focus on process data first – gives good overview of where problems are • Bottom-line doesn’t tell you where to fix – just says: “too slow”, “too many errors”, etc. • Hard to get reliable bottom-line results – need many users for statistical significance

Using the Test Results • Sort & prioritize observations – what was important? – Using the Test Results • Sort & prioritize observations – what was important? – lots of problems in the same area? • Summarize the data – make a list of all critical incidents, positive & negative – try to judge why each difficulty occurred • What does data tell you? – UI work the way you thought it would? – missing features?

Using the Results (cont. ) • Update task analysis & rethink design – rate Using the Results (cont. ) • Update task analysis & rethink design – rate severity & ease of fixing critical incidents – fix both severe problems & make the easy fixes • Will thinking aloud give the right answers? – not always – if you ask a question, people will always give an answer, even it is has nothing to do with facts • panty hose example – try to avoid specific questions

Measuring Bottom-Line Usability • Situations in which numbers are useful – time on task Measuring Bottom-Line Usability • Situations in which numbers are useful – time on task – # tasks successfully completed – # errors • define in advance what these mean • Do not combine with thinking-aloud. Why? – talking can affect speed & accuracy

Measuring Subjective User Preference • Can rate system on a Likert scale – Example: Measuring Subjective User Preference • Can rate system on a Likert scale – Example: The user interface was easy to use • Strongly disagree • Disagree • Neither agree nor disagree • Agree • Strongly agree – Can be hard to be sure what data means • novelty of UI, not realistic setting … • Can also get some useful data by asking – what they liked, disliked, where they had trouble, best part, worst part, etc. (redundant questions are OK)

Comparing Two Alternatives • Between groups experiment – two groups of test users – Comparing Two Alternatives • Between groups experiment – two groups of test users – each group uses only 1 of the systems • Within groups experiment – one group of test users • each person uses both systems • can’t use the same tasks or order (learning) – best for low-level interaction techniques • • A B Between groups requires many more participants than within groups See if differences are statistically significant – assumes normal distribution & same std. dev.

Reporting the Results • • • Report what you did & what happened Images Reporting the Results • • • Report what you did & what happened Images & graphs help people get it! Video clips can be quite convincing – Especially for convincing other engineers

Discount Usability Engineering • Reaction to excuses for not doing user testing – “too Discount Usability Engineering • Reaction to excuses for not doing user testing – “too expensive”, “takes too long”, … • Cheap – no special labs or equipment needed – the more careful you are, the better it gets • Fast – on order of 1 day to apply – standard usability testing may take a week or more • Easy to use – some techniques can be taught in 2 -4 hours

Examples of Discount Usability • Walkthroughs – put yourself in the shoes of a Examples of Discount Usability • Walkthroughs – put yourself in the shoes of a user – like a code walkthrough • • Low-fi prototyping Action analysis (GOMS) On-line, remote usability tests Heuristic evaluation

Example Heuristic • H 2 -8: Aesthetic and minimalist design – no irrelevant information Example Heuristic • H 2 -8: Aesthetic and minimalist design – no irrelevant information in dialogues

Example Heuristic • H 2 -9: Help users recognize, diagnose, and recover from errors Example Heuristic • H 2 -9: Help users recognize, diagnose, and recover from errors – error messages in plain language – precisely indicate the problem – constructively suggest a solution

Outline • Overview of the Design Process – Design – Prototyping – Evaluation • Outline • Overview of the Design Process – Design – Prototyping – Evaluation • User Models – Affordances – Mappings – Metaphors

Design of Everyday Things • By Don Norman (UCSD, Apple, HP, NN Group) Design Design of Everyday Things • By Don Norman (UCSD, Apple, HP, NN Group) Design of everyday objects illustrates problems faced by designers of systems • Explains conceptual models • – doors, washing machines, digital watches, telephones, . . . • Resulting design guides -> Highly recommend this book

Conceptual Models • • Mental representation of how object works & how interface controls Conceptual Models • • Mental representation of how object works & how interface controls affect it People may have preconceived models that are hard to change – (4 + 5) vs. (4 5 +) – dragging to trash? • delete file but eject disk • Interface must communicate model – visually – online help and documentation can help, but shouldn’t be necessary

Affordances as Perceptual Clues • Well-designed objects have affordances – clues to their operation Affordances as Perceptual Clues • Well-designed objects have affordances – clues to their operation – often visual, but not always (e. g. , speech)

Affordances as Perceptual Clues Siemens Pocket PC Phone Pen input, no keypad Handspring Treo Affordances as Perceptual Clues Siemens Pocket PC Phone Pen input, no keypad Handspring Treo Pen input/keypad input

Affordances as Perceptual Clues • Poorly-designed objects – no clues or misleading clues French Affordances as Perceptual Clues • Poorly-designed objects – no clues or misleading clues French artist Jacques Carelman Crazy design for a screw punch!

Refrigerator freezer fresh food Problem: freezer too cold, but fresh food just right Refrigerator freezer fresh food Problem: freezer too cold, but fresh food just right

Refrigerator Controls Normal Settings Colder Fresh Food Coldest Fresh Food Colder Freezer Warmer Fresh Refrigerator Controls Normal Settings Colder Fresh Food Coldest Fresh Food Colder Freezer Warmer Fresh Food OFF (both) A B C D E C and 5 C and 6 -7 B and 8 -9 D and 7 -8 C and 4 -1 0 7 6 5 4 3 What is your conceptual model?

A Common Conceptual Model A B C D E 7 6 5 4 cooling A Common Conceptual Model A B C D E 7 6 5 4 cooling unit 3 cooling unit independent controls

Actual Conceptual Model A B C D E cooling unit 7 • • 6 Actual Conceptual Model A B C D E cooling unit 7 • • 6 5 4 3 Now can you fix the problem? Possible solutions – – make controls map to user’s model make controls map to actual system

Design Model & User Model Design Model User Model System Image • • Users Design Model & User Model Design Model User Model System Image • • Users get model from experience & usage – through system image What if the two models don’t match?

Conceptual Model Mismatch • Mismatch between designer’s & user’s conceptual model leads to… – Conceptual Model Mismatch • Mismatch between designer’s & user’s conceptual model leads to… – Slow performance – Errors • And inability to recover – Frustration –. . .

Notorious Example Notorious Example

A Personal Example A Personal Example

Make Things Visible • Refrigerator (? ) – make the A. . E dial Make Things Visible • Refrigerator (? ) – make the A. . E dial something about percentage of cooling between the two compartments? • Controls available on watch w/ 3 buttons? – too many and they are not visible! • Compare to controls on simple car radio – #controls = #functions – controls are labeled (? ) and grouped together

Map Interface Controls • • Control should mirror real-world Which is better for dashboard Map Interface Controls • • Control should mirror real-world Which is better for dashboard speaker front / back control? Dashboard

Map Interface Controls Map Interface Controls

Map Interface Controls Map Interface Controls

Metaphor • Definition ? – “The transference of the relation between one set of Metaphor • Definition ? – “The transference of the relation between one set of objects to another set for the purpose of brief explanation. ” • Lakoff & Johnson, Metaphors We Live By – “. . . the way we think, what we experience, and what we do every day is very much a matter of metaphor. ” – in our language & thinking - “argument is war” • he attacked every weak point. . . criticisms right on target. . . if you use that strategy • We can use metaphors to leverage existing conceptual models

Desktop Metaphor • Suggests a conceptual model – Not really an attempt to simulate Desktop Metaphor • Suggests a conceptual model – Not really an attempt to simulate a real desktop – Leverages existing knowledge about files, folders, trash – A way to explain why some windows seemed blocked • The “user illusion”

Example Metaphors • Global metaphors – personal assistant, e-wallet, e-mail, digital library • Data Example Metaphors • Global metaphors – personal assistant, e-wallet, e-mail, digital library • Data & function – rolodex, to-do list, calendar, documents • Collections – drawers, files, books, newspapers, photo albums

Four Key Ideas Four Key Ideas

Summary • Overview of the Design Process – Design – Prototyping – Evaluation • Summary • Overview of the Design Process – Design – Prototyping – Evaluation • User Models – Affordances – Mappings – Metaphors (Task Analysis, Contextual Inquiry, Tasks) (Paper prototyping) (Lab tests, Heuristic evaluation)




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