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Mobile Multimedia Applications The information about Nokia Mobile Phones is from the talk Market Mobile Multimedia Applications The information about Nokia Mobile Phones is from the talk Market and Technology Fundamentals for Multi Media Services by Timo Toikkanen at the VIEW Technology Workshop, Hong Kong, August 2002 © Copyright 2002 Michael G. Christel and Alexander G. Hauptmann 1 Carnegie Mellon

Wireless Futures • Internet supports e-commerce • Wireless Internet will support m-commerce • Normal Wireless Futures • Internet supports e-commerce • Wireless Internet will support m-commerce • Normal in a few years • M-commerce is facilitated by high-rate GSM-like service • GPRS/HSCSD (Hi Speed Circuit Switched Data) with a of bitrate 144 kbps • Need higher bitrate (4 G) to avoid the World Wide Wait • Mobile palmtop device will be dominant • Always internet linked, no distinction between mobile and fixed office © Copyright 2002 Michael G. Christel and Alexander G. Hauptmann 2 Carnegie Mellon

4 G Networks? • Bandwidth of 100 Mbit/s • Due 2006 – 2010 • 4 G Networks? • Bandwidth of 100 Mbit/s • Due 2006 – 2010 • But: Too many 3 G standards now, slows development • Permanent internet connection (IPv 6 address) while mobile • All digital, packet switched, with tight security • Extends 3 G by >10 x • Not backwards compatible • Enables full interactive video services © Copyright 2002 Michael G. Christel and Alexander G. Hauptmann 3 Carnegie Mellon

Mobile Multimedia Computing Requires • Powerful multimedia handsets with fast CPUs, bluetooth earpiece, camera, Mobile Multimedia Computing Requires • Powerful multimedia handsets with fast CPUs, bluetooth earpiece, camera, wireless pen • Speech recognition, handwriting recognition • LCD displays or projection to spectacles • More battery power (longer battery life) • Energy from shoe by walking • Body heat from clothing © Copyright 2002 Michael G. Christel and Alexander G. Hauptmann 4 Carnegie Mellon

Video for wireless multimedia • Quarter size video 10 fps encoded at 20 – Video for wireless multimedia • Quarter size video 10 fps encoded at 20 – 500 kbps requires transmission capacity of 2 - 50 voice conversations • Full size video at 30 fps requires 32 GSM channels • The World Wide Wait is coming! © Copyright 2002 Michael G. Christel and Alexander G. Hauptmann 5 Carnegie Mellon

Wireless & Multimedia • Video Transmission over wireless channels Video Compression for wireless channels Wireless & Multimedia • Video Transmission over wireless channels Video Compression for wireless channels Video Streaming over wireless channels Pre and Post Processing techniques for Error Resiliency & Error Concealment Qo. S (Quality of Service) in wireless multimedia Media-Processors in wireless applications and IP Networks © Copyright 2002 Michael G. Christel and Alexander G. Hauptmann 7 Carnegie Mellon

Universal Access Any information Any network Any device © Copyright 2002 Michael G. Christel Universal Access Any information Any network Any device © Copyright 2002 Michael G. Christel and Alexander G. Hauptmann 9 Carnegie Mellon

What is 3 G? 3 G wireless technology is a global communication technology based What is 3 G? 3 G wireless technology is a global communication technology based on packetbased transmission of digitized voice, data, and video. It includes multiple competing wireless technologies like • Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) 2000, • Universal Mobile Telecommunications Service (UMTS), and • wideband CDMA (WCDMA) are found. 3 G is capable of delivering data transmission speeds of • 144 K bit/sec inside a moving vehicle, • 384 K bit/sec standing or walking, and 2 M bit/sec in a fixed location, using packet-based rather than circuit switched technology and permitting global roaming. • © Copyright 2002 Michael G. Christel and Alexander G. Hauptmann 10 Carnegie Mellon

All those Gs: 1 G, 2. 5 G, 3 G 1 G: First generation All those Gs: 1 G, 2. 5 G, 3 G 1 G: First generation cellular phone technology, analog, Advanced Mobile Phone Service (AMPS) 2 G: Second Generation digital technology, voice centric, TDMA, CDMA, GSM 2. 5 G: Second Generation with upgrades for speed, packet focus (e. g. GPRS layered on top of GSM) Data rates from 56 up to 114 Kbps 3 G: Third generation, data centric, packet based optimized for high bandwidth, WCDMA and UMTS © Copyright 2002 Michael G. Christel and Alexander G. Hauptmann 11 Carnegie Mellon

What 3 G Networks mean to the Consumer • 3 G is video conferencing What 3 G Networks mean to the Consumer • 3 G is video conferencing in a taxi • 3 G is singing karaoke in a bus • 3 G is sending images straight from the field to headquarters for analysis • 3 G is sharing your Japan vocation with your friends from Hong Kong • 3 G is playing a multi-user role playing game on the bus to work • … © Copyright 2002 Michael G. Christel and Alexander G. Hauptmann 12 Carnegie Mellon

A New Language of Cell Phones - from 'listen to what I say' to A New Language of Cell Phones - from 'listen to what I say' to 'see what I mean' • Imaging is the next phase of mobile communication evolution • Magnitude of appeal parallel to that of mobile voice • Imaging is the major catalyst for MMS At the end of 2002, about half of Nokia mobile phone delivery volumes will be MMS enabled In 2003, a majority of all new Nokia terminals will have MMS capability

Short Messaging Service (SMS) SMS a service for sending messages of up to 160 Short Messaging Service (SMS) SMS a service for sending messages of up to 160 characters (224 characters if using a 5 -bit mode) to mobile phones that use Global System for Mobile (GSM) communication. Primarily used in Europe and Asia. Can be sent to digital phones from a Web site equipped with PC Link or from one digital phone to another. Typical uses of SMS include: • Notifying a mobile phone owner of a voicemail message • Notifying a salesperson of an inquiry and contact to call • Notifying a doctor of a patient with an emergency problem • Notifying a service person of the time and place of their next call • Notifying a driver of the address of the next pickup An SMS gateway is a Web site that lets you enter an SMS message to someone within the cell served by that gateway or that acts as an international gateway for users with roaming capability. 14 © Copyright 2002 Michael G. Christel and Alexander G. Hauptmann Carnegie Mellon

Multimedia Messaging Services Messaging interface Photo album MMS message All messaging Pictures can be Multimedia Messaging Services Messaging interface Photo album MMS message All messaging Pictures can be MMS messaging services including stored in the photo can combine text, SMS, MMS & e-mail album pictures and audio collected under one application MMS delivery The address formats supported are global phone numbers and simple e-mail addresses

Learning the SMS lesson What is needed for a fast mobile service growth Convenient Learning the SMS lesson What is needed for a fast mobile service growth Convenient charging model Interoperator delivery Ease of Use Standardised service Penetration & legacy support Widespread adoption of a common and easy to use application • creates a big unified market • … and a platform • feeds its own growth • everyone profits

Convenient Charging Model for MMS • It is predicted that MMS charging model follows Convenient Charging Model for MMS • It is predicted that MMS charging model follows the one of the existing SMS. • This enables secure, familiar and low risk charging from end-user perspective. • Preferred billing model: "Sender pays all costs" • However MMS supports various charging models, but changes to SMS charging model should be implemented only after a thorough analysis of the effects on the end user behavior. © Copyright 2002 Michael G. Christel and Alexander G. Hauptmann 17 Carnegie Mellon

MMS Interoperability • Ensure MMS interoperability between terminals and network equipment from different manufacturers MMS Interoperability • Ensure MMS interoperability between terminals and network equipment from different manufacturers • Allow smooth take-off of MMS • Key tasks include • facilitation and co-ordination of MMS interoperability testing • problem solving and sharing of information regarding findings • In addition to following the complete specifications, agree on a minimum subset of features that MMS equipment will support © Copyright 2002 Michael G. Christel and Alexander G. Hauptmann 18 Carnegie Mellon

Messaging Migration - from SMS to Mobile Multimedia Messaging Migration - from SMS to Mobile Multimedia

MMS is capturing and sharing moments MMS is capturing and sharing moments

MMS is capturing and sharing moments MMS is capturing and sharing moments

3 key trends in mobile user interfaces Large color screens – Evolution of mobile 3 key trends in mobile user interfaces Large color screens – Evolution of mobile communication from ears to eyes, from voice to imaging Powerful navigation solutions – The crucial ergonomics to make advanced functionality easy to use 3 rd party SW and content (MMS, Java, XHTML) – Open platforms and technologies enable developers and consumers to add new functionalities to devices - and unleash collective innovation

Nokia User Interface series All available during 2002 Series 30 Series 40 Cost driven Nokia User Interface series All available during 2002 Series 30 Series 40 Cost driven platform Size driven colour platform Series 60 Series 80 One-hand operated Two-hand operated feature Platform feature platform 176 x 208 640 x 200 XHTML MIDP Java MMS HTML Personal Java MMS Nokia OS Symbian OS 96 x 65 128 x 128 Nokia OS

Nokia MMS enabled fones (more coming soon. . ) Nokia MMS enabled fones (more coming soon. . )

Comparison of Nokia MMS Phones Low-tier Mid-tier High-tier Comparison of Nokia MMS Phones Low-tier Mid-tier High-tier

© Copyright 2002 Michael G. Christel and Alexander G. Hauptmann 27 Carnegie Mellon © Copyright 2002 Michael G. Christel and Alexander G. Hauptmann 27 Carnegie Mellon