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Hazard Communication GENERAL Revised to include the Global Harmonization Standard (GHS) Revised December 2016 Hazard Communication GENERAL Revised to include the Global Harmonization Standard (GHS) Revised December 2016 1

Introduction The purpose of this training is to familiarize you with the Occupational Safety Introduction The purpose of this training is to familiarize you with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) Hazard Communication standard 29 CFR 1910. 1200 & The Alaska Occupational Safety and Health Program (AKOSH) standard 8 AAC 61. 1110 (adds the requirement to include physical agents) 2

Overview • • What is Hazard Communication? What are the program requirements? Hazards of Overview • • What is Hazard Communication? What are the program requirements? Hazards of non-routine work Training requirements Safety Data Sheets (SDS) Physical Agent Data Sheets (PADS) Labeling What are the hazards? • • • Health & Physical Other Routes of exposure/entry Protective measures Inventory requirements What now? 3

Hazard Communication • OSHA Hazard Communication Standard 29 CFR 1910. 1200 – “Right to Hazard Communication • OSHA Hazard Communication Standard 29 CFR 1910. 1200 – “Right to Know” went into effect in November 1985. Often referred to as “Hazcom. ” • OSHA updated the Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) in 2012 to be more in line with global systems. This update provides a common and coherent approach to classifying chemicals and communicating hazard information on labels and safety data sheets. • The purpose of Hazcom is to ensure that information concerning hazards associated with the workplace is communicated to employees. • You, as an employee, have the right to understand the hazards in your work area and the potential effects of these hazards upon your health and safety. 4

Hazard Communication It may seem easy enough to expect chemicals and physical hazards to Hazard Communication It may seem easy enough to expect chemicals and physical hazards to be in labs, shops, and maintenance areas; however, hazards can also be found in offices, classrooms, and other work areas. These may include: Copier/printer toners Dry erase cleaners Cleaning chemicals, sprays Vibration Extreme temperatures Noise 5

Hazard Communication • Hazardous materials (chemical products) and physical agents (radiation, lasers, vibration, etc. Hazard Communication • Hazardous materials (chemical products) and physical agents (radiation, lasers, vibration, etc. ) can be found anywhere. It has been estimated that over a half million chemical products are used by business and industry every year. Some of these hazards pose little danger to you, while others may be deadly. • Modern manufacturing would not be possible without chemicals and processes. However, like machinery or electrical equipment, you must know how to use chemicals safely. • The first step in working safely is to recognize those materials and processes that may be hazardous to your health or physical safety. 6

Program Requirements The OSHA Hazcom Standard contains several key areas of compliance to include: Program Requirements The OSHA Hazcom Standard contains several key areas of compliance to include: • Written Program - A written program must be developed which ties together all of the elements below. • Safety Data Sheets – Written or printed material containing detailed information of each hazardous material listed on the Materials Inventory. • Labeling – Information that is affixed to, printed on, or attached to the immediate container of a hazardous chemical, or to the outside packaging. • Training - All employees must be trained to identify and work safely with hazardous materials. • Materials Inventory - A list of the hazardous materials and other physical hazards present in your work area. 7

Written Hazcom Program UAF’s Written Hazard Communication Program is titled: UAF Policy and Procedure Written Hazcom Program UAF’s Written Hazard Communication Program is titled: UAF Policy and Procedure #503, Hazard Communication Procedure This document can be accessed at: http: //www. uaf. edu/safety/occupationalsafety/hazard-communication/ The written policy addresses the following information (also included in this training): • • • Information regarding non-routine hazards Employee training information Safety Data Sheets Labels and other forms of warning Hazard communication in multi-employer work areas 8

Workplace-Specific Hazard Communication Plan To facilitate compliance with UAF Policy 503, departments shall also Workplace-Specific Hazard Communication Plan To facilitate compliance with UAF Policy 503, departments shall also complete and maintain a “Workplace-Specific Hazard Communication Plan” The plan template can be found on the Environmental, Health, Safety, and Risk Management (EHSRM) website at: http: //www. uaf. edu/safety/occupationalsafety/hazard-communication/ 9

Hazards of Non-Routine Tasks Periodically, employees may be required to perform hazardous tasks that Hazards of Non-Routine Tasks Periodically, employees may be required to perform hazardous tasks that are non-routine. Prior to starting work on such projects • Affected employees must be given information by their supervisor on the hazards to which they may be exposed while performing such tasks. This information will include: • Specific hazard information • Measures the department has taken to reduce the risk of these hazards, such as providing ventilation, ensuring the presence of another employee, providing a respiratory protection program, and establishing emergency procedures • Required personal protective equipment DO NOT PROCEED until you have been provided this information! 10

Employee Training Requirements • Employee training is an integral part of the Hazcom program Employee Training Requirements • Employee training is an integral part of the Hazcom program and must be provided: • At the time of initial assignment (within 10 days of hire) • Whenever a new hazard is introduced into the workplace, and • When employees may be exposed to workplace hazards created by another employer at the worksite (a contractor) • Hazcom GHS training • Provides a general overview of the OSHA HCS and UAF Hazard Communication Procedure • Hazcom– Site specific training • In addition to this general overview training you are to receive site-specific training from your supervisor. • This training will include specific hazards in your work area, contents of unlabeled pipes, and methods to reduce hazards (engineering controls, administrative controls, product substitution, and personal protective equipment, etc. ). 11

Safety Data Sheets (SDS) • The SDS replaces the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) Safety Data Sheets (SDS) • The SDS replaces the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) • Required since June 1, 2015 12

Safety Data Sheets • Written or printed material concerning a hazardous chemical that references Safety Data Sheets • Written or printed material concerning a hazardous chemical that references and identifies specific characteristics, hazards, and other requirements related to the use of the product • Safety Data Sheets are available for ALL of the hazardous materials present in your work areas • Each department, lab or shop MUST maintain a Safety Data Sheet for each hazardous chemical product listed on their inventory • May be maintained in any form (hard copy, e-copy, etc. ) but must be readily accessible to all employees, during each shift, whenever they are in their work area 13

SDS Information The Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) requires chemical manufacturers, distributors, or importers to SDS Information The Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) requires chemical manufacturers, distributors, or importers to provide Safety Data Sheets (SDSs) (formerly known as Material Safety Data Sheets or MSDSs) to communicate the hazards of hazardous chemical products. Unlike the previous Material Safety Data Sheet format, the new HCS requires SDSs to be in a standard 16 section format, and include the section numbers, the headings, and associated information under the headings. The following slides list those sections and the general content contained in each section…. . 14

SDS Section Information Section 1 - Identification includes product identifier; manufacturer or distributor name, SDS Section Information Section 1 - Identification includes product identifier; manufacturer or distributor name, address, phone number; emergency phone number; recommended use; and any restrictions on use. Section 2 - Hazard(s) Identification includes all hazards regarding the chemical; and lists required label elements. Section 3 - Composition/Information on Ingredients includes information on chemical ingredients, including trade secret claims. Section 4 - First-Aid Measures includes important symptoms, acute effects, delayed affects, and required treatment. Section 5 - Fire-Fighting Measures lists suitable extinguishing techniques and equipment; and hazardous chemical hazards that may be produced during a fire. Section 6 - Accidental Release Measures lists emergency procedures, protective equipment, and proper methods of containment and cleanup. 15

SDS Section Information Section 7 - Handling and Storage lists precautions for safe handling SDS Section Information Section 7 - Handling and Storage lists precautions for safe handling and storage, including incompatibilities. Section 8 - Exposure Controls/Personal Protection lists OSHA’s Permissible Exposure Limits (PELs), Threshold Limit Values (TLVs), appropriate engineering controls, and personal protective equipment (PPE). Section 9 - Physical and Chemical Properties lists the chemical’s characteristics. Section 10 - Stability and Reactivity lists chemical stability and possibility of hazardous reactions. Section 11 - Toxicological Information includes routes of exposure, related symptoms, acute and chronic effects, and numerical measures of toxicity. 16

SDS Section Information Section 12 - Ecological Information include effects of chemical if released SDS Section Information Section 12 - Ecological Information include effects of chemical if released into the environment, and describes the chemical’s environmental fate. Section 13 - Disposal Considerations list proper procedures for disposal. Section 14 - Transport Information provides shipping information Section 15 - Regulatory Information provides information on regulations affecting the chemical. Section 16 - Other information includes the date of preparation or last revision. 17

How to obtain a Safety Data Sheet (SDS) for products listed on your Materials How to obtain a Safety Data Sheet (SDS) for products listed on your Materials Inventory • EHSRM recommends using the SDS management system “MSDS Online®” for obtaining the most upto date Safety Data Sheets available • The MSDS Online® program is accessed through the same web-based “Environmental Health and Safety Assistant (EHS Assist) program you’ll use to manage your chemical inventory • Information on how to access to these programs, along with tutorials on their use, can be found on the EHSRM website at: http: //www. uaf. edu/safety/industrialhygiene/laboratory-safety/chem-gas/chemicalinventory/ 18

What you need to know about your Safety Data Sheets (SDSs) • Ask your What you need to know about your Safety Data Sheets (SDSs) • Ask your supervisor or manager where the SDSs are located in your work area or contact EHSRM for assistance. SDSs must always be available! • Take time to read the SDSs which contain important information about the hazardous materials present in your workplace. • Understand the safe use and handling, storage, transport, and disposal requirements • Know the exposure and spill provisions of your materials • Remember, knowing where your SDS are located and how to use them is your responsibility. It is part of your job. 19

Physical Agents Alaska Administrative Code 8 AAC 61. 110 Additional Hazard Communication Standards • Physical Agents Alaska Administrative Code 8 AAC 61. 110 Additional Hazard Communication Standards • Requires employers to also maintain a Physical Agent Data Sheet (PADS) for each physical agent in the workplace that exceeds established thresholds • Physical agents may include the following: v Heat and Cold Stress v Ionizing Radiation v Lasers v Radio Frequency v Microwave and Ultraviolet Radiation v Noise v Hand-Arm (segmental) Vibration 20

Physical Agents • EHSRM can help you determine if these agents exist in your Physical Agents • EHSRM can help you determine if these agents exist in your workplace and whether occupational thresholds have been, or may be, exceeded • If these hazards exist in your workplace, employees must be trained on the applicable PADS • Departments can access PADS on the EHSRM website at: http: //www. uaf. edu/safety/occupationalsafety/hazard-communication/ ……or directly from the AKOSH website at: http: //labor. alaska. gov/lss/pads. htm 21

Labeling • Container labels provide employees with immediate information regarding the physical and health Labeling • Container labels provide employees with immediate information regarding the physical and health hazards of the specific hazardous material within the container • Chemical manufacturers, importers, and distributors must ensure that hazardous material containers leaving their workplaces are properly labeled • Labels MUST contain the following information: • The Product Identifier • Signal Word • Hazard Statement(s) • Pictogram(s) • Precautionary Statement(s) • Name, Address, and Telephone Number of Chemical Manufacturer, Importer, or other Responsible Party 22

Key Label Terms • The Product Identifier: A name or number used for a Key Label Terms • The Product Identifier: A name or number used for a hazardous chemical on a label or SDS. It provides a unique means by which the user can identify the chemical. • Signal Word: indicates the relative level of severity of hazard and alert the reader to a potential hazard on the label. Example: "Danger" is used for the more severe hazards, and “Warning" is used for the less severe hazards. • Hazard Statement(s): a statement assigned to a hazard class and category that describes the nature of the hazard(s) of a chemical, including, where appropriate, the degree of hazard • Pictogram: are symbols and other graphic elements which convey specific information about the hazards of a chemical. Eight pictograms are designated under this standard for application to a hazard category • Precautionary Statement: describes recommended measures that should be taken to minimize or prevent adverse effects resulting from exposure to a hazardous chemical, or improper storage or handling 23

Labeling = Immediate Awareness An important part of the hazard communication labeling process is Labeling = Immediate Awareness An important part of the hazard communication labeling process is helping employees better understand the risks of using hazardous materials…. BEFORE someone gets hurt! • First, the label SIGNAL WORD gives an immediate indication on the severity of chemical hazard • Second, the label Hazard Statement provides an immediate indication of the actual hazards • Third, the Precautionary Statement provides timely recommendations to help prevent adverse exposure or improper use. The Signal Word "DANGER" could mean life-threatening: • Highly flammable vapor…… (Hazard Statement) • Use of explosion-proof equipment required and do not breathe vapors…… (Precautionary Statement) Would that influence you on how to use that product? 24

Labeling GHS Pictograms 25 Labeling GHS Pictograms 25

Required Labeling Information 26 Required Labeling Information 26

Labeling Reminders • UAF employees must ensure that workplace labels are legible and prominently Labeling Reminders • UAF employees must ensure that workplace labels are legible and prominently displayed on the container, or readily available in the work area throughout each work shift • Labels serve only as an immediate warning. See the Safety Data Sheet for detailed information. • Do not remove or deface existing labels on incoming containers of hazardous chemicals, unless the container is immediately marked with the required information • NOTE: Laboratory workers who ship hazardous chemicals are required to affix HCS-compliant labels to the containers as well as supply a SDS to the receiving party, and must be trained to ship these materials. Contact EHSRM at 474 -6771 for assistance. 27

Labeling Exception Labeling is not required on portable containers into which hazardous chemicals are Labeling Exception Labeling is not required on portable containers into which hazardous chemicals are transferred from labeled containers, and which are intended only for the immediate use of the employee who performs the transfer Best Practice: Label transfer containers in the event they are misplaced or not immediately used 28

Workplace Labeling Options While shipped containers require certain information previously discussed, there are other Workplace Labeling Options While shipped containers require certain information previously discussed, there are other options for labeling in the workplace • Chemical containers in the workplace may contain the original manufacturer, importer or distributor label, or…. • Other labeling systems can be used that convey a product identifier and words, pictures, symbols, etc. , that provide general information regarding the chemical hazards* * When alternate labels are used, other written information, such as SDSs, must also be present in the workplace which provide “specific” physical and health hazard information on that product 29

Special Labeling Options for Laboratory Chemicals • • Some containers at UAF pre-date the Special Labeling Options for Laboratory Chemicals • • Some containers at UAF pre-date the GHSHazcom standard, and do not have pictograms or hazard statements on the label You can re-label the container with a GHScompliant label, available through MSDS Online, your Chemical Hygiene Officer, or EHSRM Some containers are too small to accommodate a label with all of the required information If you use such chemicals, it is YOUR responsibility to read the GHS-compliant SDS for that chemical to obtain hazard information prior to using the chemical 30

Workplace Labeling Options Acceptable forms of labeling include: • Primary labels provided by the Workplace Labeling Options Acceptable forms of labeling include: • Primary labels provided by the manufacturers, distributors, or suppliers* • Hazardous Material Information System (HMIS) • National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) • Department of Transportation (DOT) • Mallinckrodt Baker • Fisher Example Label: Ask EHSRM for assistance with procuring new, or replacing 31 worn labels for your department’s chemical containers

Materials Inventory • Your Department Supervisor will prepare and keep current an inventory list Materials Inventory • Your Department Supervisor will prepare and keep current an inventory list of all known hazardous chemicals present in your workplace • Departments are required to use the Environmental, Health, and Safety (EHS) Assistant Program to create and maintain their hazardous materials inventory • Guidance and tutorials on how to create an inventory, as well as access to the EHS Assist Program, can be found on the EHSRM website: http: //www. uaf. edu/safety/industrialhygiene/laboratory-safety/chem-gas/chemicalinventory/ 32

Health Hazards You must understand how to detect the presence or release of hazardous Health Hazards You must understand how to detect the presence or release of hazardous chemicals in their work area Additionally, you must understand how to protect yourself from hazardous chemical exposures • Your supervisor must instruct you on the health and physical hazards of chemicals used in your work area • Health hazard information can be found in Sections 2 and 11 on the product’s Safety Data Sheet (SDS) 33

Health Hazards A chemical that can have acute or chronic health effects is a Health Hazards A chemical that can have acute or chronic health effects is a health hazard • The following is a brief description of types of chemicals with major health hazards and their appropriate pictogram. These hazards include: • • • Sensitizers Toxic substances Irritants Carcinogens Corrosive agents which damage lungs, skin, eyes, or mucus membranes 34

Health Hazard Effects Sensitizers - cause an allergic skin or lung reaction Acutely Toxic Health Hazard Effects Sensitizers - cause an allergic skin or lung reaction Acutely Toxic Materials - cause an adverse effect, even at a very low dose Primary Irritants - cause intense redness or swelling of the skin or eyes on contact, but with no permanent tissue damage Organ-Specific Hazards - may cause damage to specific organ systems, such as the blood, liver, lungs, or reproductive system 35

Health Hazard Effects Corrosives - cause tissue damage and burns on contact with the Health Hazard Effects Corrosives - cause tissue damage and burns on contact with the skin and eyes Carcinogens and Teratogens - may cause cancer or birth defects, respectively REMEMBER – These and other specific health hazards are listed on the Safety Data Sheet! The pictogram on the product label is your first warning as to the hazardous nature of the chemical! 36

Physical Hazards Any chemical that is classified as having one of the following hazardous Physical Hazards Any chemical that is classified as having one of the following hazardous effects: Combustible liquid Compressed gas Explosive Oxidizer Unstable (reactive) Pyrophoric Water reactive Flammable Organic peroxide 37

Other Types of Hazards • “Simple Asphyxiant” Hazards – a substance or mixture that Other Types of Hazards • “Simple Asphyxiant” Hazards – a substance or mixture that displaces oxygen in the ambient atmosphere, and can thus cause oxygen deprivation in those who are exposed, leading to unconsciousness and death. • “Combustible Dust” Hazards - dusts that may cause a deflagration, other fires, or an explosion. These dusts include, but are not limited to: metal, wood, coal, plastic, adhesives, biosolids, sugar, flour, paper, etc. • “Pyrophoric Gas” Hazards - a chemical in a gaseous state that will ignite spontaneously in air at a temperature of 130 degrees F (54. 4 degrees C) or less. • Hazards not Otherwise Classified - an adverse physical or health effect that does not meet the specified criteria for the physical and health hazard classes already defined. 38

Routes of Exposure There are four ways a hazardous chemical can contact or enter Routes of Exposure There are four ways a hazardous chemical can contact or enter your body and cause you harm • Skin/Eye Contact and Absorption: Many chemicals can cause direct averse effects at the point of contact with the skin or eyes. Additionally, some can be absorbed into the body through the skin or eyes, causing harmful effects elsewhere in the body. Exposures can occur from dusts, gases, mists, and liquids. • Ingestion: Chemicals can be ingested through the mouth as a result of hand-to-mouth contact, consuming contaminated food or drink, or smoking cigarettes that have come into contact with a chemical or unclean hands. Workplace chemicals can also be accidentally swallowed. • Inhalation (Breathing): Airborne chemicals, in the forms of gases, mists, smoke, dust, and vapor, can be inhaled into the body through the mouth and/or nose • Injection: Biological or chemical substances can be injected into the body by accidentally puncturing the skin with a contaminated needle, tool, or other sharp object 39

Protective Measures Your department-specific Hazcom plan MUST include specific protective measures implemented to protect Protective Measures Your department-specific Hazcom plan MUST include specific protective measures implemented to protect employees from hazards in the workplace. These include: • Methods and Observations You must understand the methods and observations that may be used to detect the presence or release of a hazardous chemical in the work area (such as personal monitoring conducted by EHSRM, continuous monitoring devices, visual appearance or odor of hazardous chemicals when being released, etc. ) • Physical and Health Hazards You must understand the physical, health, simple asphyxiation, combustible dust and pyrophoric gas hazards, as well as hazards not otherwise classified, of the chemicals in the work area 40

Protective Measures • Engineering Controls Well designed work areas minimize exposure to materials which Protective Measures • Engineering Controls Well designed work areas minimize exposure to materials which are hazardous. Examples of engineering controls include exhaust systems and wetting systems to control dust. Understand which controls are used with chemical processes • Work Practices Safe work practices will insure that chemicals are used correctly and safely. Review you chemical Job Hazard Analysis • Product Substitution Because many chemicals do similar jobs, it is important to select chemicals that do a good job, while being less toxic. • Personal Protective Equipment Respirators, eye protection, gloves, aprons, and other protective equipment and clothing are designed to protect you while you work - USE THEM! • Emergency Procedures Specific emergency procedures established to protect employees. Review your Department Hazcom Plan for details 41

What Now? Knowing how to work safely with chemicals and other physical agents is What Now? Knowing how to work safely with chemicals and other physical agents is an important activity. • Know the location of, and review your departmentspecific Hazcom Plan with your supervisor • Review the UAF Written Hazard Communication Program (Policy #503) • Know the location of your chemical and physical hazards/agents inventory and SDS files • Understand what personal protective equipment (PPE) you will need when dealing with hazards • Speak with your supervisor about additional training required for non-routine chemical tasks 42

Use The EHSRM Hazard Communication Help Page Use the many tools on our website Use The EHSRM Hazard Communication Help Page Use the many tools on our website to assist you with program compliance: • The EHSRM “Steps to Hazard Communication Compliance” checklist • Create Chemical inventories online • Safety Data Sheet (SDS) training and SDS look-ups • Written Hazcom Plan template • And more…… • Bookmark this link now! http: //www. uaf. edu/safety/occupationalsafety/hazard-communication/ 43

Need Assistance? • Safety Officers (Develop Work-Specific Plan) Kim Knudsen, 474 -5476 Thadd Williamson, Need Assistance? • Safety Officers (Develop Work-Specific Plan) Kim Knudsen, 474 -5476 Thadd Williamson, 474 -2762 • Hazmat Lead (Inventories and Safety Data Sheets) Richard Deck, 474 -5617 • Industrial Hygienist (Protective Measures) Tracey Martinson, 474 -6771 Main Office Line: 474 -5413 Fax: 474 -5489 Email: [email protected] edu Website: www. uaf. edu/safety 44