Скачать презентацию Food Safety Specialized Compartments Sealed crisper drawers provide Скачать презентацию Food Safety Specialized Compartments Sealed crisper drawers provide

food safety.pptx

  • Количество слайдов: 14

Food Safety Specialized Compartments Sealed crisper drawers provide an optimal storage environment for fruits Food Safety Specialized Compartments Sealed crisper drawers provide an optimal storage environment for fruits and vegetables. Vegetables require higher humidity conditions while fruits require lower humidity conditions. Some crispers are equipped with controls to allow the consumer to customize each drawer’s humidity level. An adjustable temperature meat drawer maximizes the storage time of meats and cheeses. Additional cool air is directed into the drawer to keep items very cold without freezing. Safety of Foods Stored on the Door Don't store perishable foods in the door. Eggs should be stored in the carton on a shelf. The temperature of the storage bins in the door fluctuate more than the temperature in the cabinet. Keep the door closed as much as possible. Placement of Foods The temperature in a refrigerator should be 40 °F or below throughout the unit, so that any place is safe for storage of any food. Raw meat, poultry, and seafood should be in a sealed container or wrapped securely to prevent raw juices from contaminating other foods. Some refrigerators have special features such as adjustable shelves, door bins, crispers, and meat/cheese drawers. These features are designed to make storage of foods more convenient and to provide an optimal storage environment for fruits, vegetables, meats, poultry, and cheese. Shelves should be adjustable to accommodate a variety of packages. Tempered glass shelves are attractive and easy to clean. Some refrigerators feature sealed glass shelves to contain spills and make cleanup easier. Some shelves pull out to provide better accessibility to items in the back.

Food Storage is another way to protect your food from becoming contaminated or spoiled. Food Storage is another way to protect your food from becoming contaminated or spoiled. There are rules for this area as well. Use the “first in, first out” (FIFO in accounting) rule meaning that foods should be used in the order they are delivered. For instance, do not use the newest milk first if you still have two gallons that are good from your last delivery. Date goods and place the new behind the old on your storage shelves. Keep all foods wrapped and clean. Each item in your walk-in refrigerator, freezer and your dry storage should be in a sealed labeled container or package with the contents and date received. Do not take a chance on questionable foods: “When in doubt, throw it out” is a great rule to live when it comes to food safety. Go through your refrigerator unit regularly and get rid of spoiled foods. The refrigerator temperature must be below 38 degrees F. Items stored include meats, seafood, vegetables and dairy products. Keep a working thermometer in the unit at all times so you will know at a glance if there is a problem. You do not want to lose your entire inventory! Freezers should keep foods at below 0 degrees F. Most foods will not maintain their quality in a freezer so it should be used only as needed. Use fresh products whenever possible. Items in dry storage should be kept between 50 – 70 degrees F with a relative humidity of 50 – 60%.

Which foods are ‘potentially hazardous foods’? Potentially hazardous foods are foods that might contain Which foods are ‘potentially hazardous foods’? Potentially hazardous foods are foods that might contain food poisoning bacteria and are capable of supporting growth of these bacteria or formation of toxins to levels that are unsafe for consumers, if the foods are not stored at correct temperatures. Toxins are poisonous chemicals produced by some types of bacteria. The following are examples of potentially hazardous foods: raw and cooked meat or foods containing meat, such as casseroles, curries and lasagne; dairy products, for example, milk, custard and dairy based desserts; seafood (excluding live seafood); processed fruits and vegetables, for example, salads; cooked rice and pasta; foods containing eggs, beans, nuts or other protein rich foods, such as quiche and soy products; foods that contain these foods, such as sandwiches and rolls.

Which foods are not potentially hazardous foods? Many preserved foods do not contain food Which foods are not potentially hazardous foods? Many preserved foods do not contain food poisoning bacteria. Also, bacteria will not grow in some types of food. Examples include canned and bottled food, dried fruit, salted dried meats, fermented dried meats, yoghurts, hard cheeses, spreads, some sauces, dried pasta, breads and dried foods. However, some foods that are not potentially hazardous can become potentially hazardous if you alter the food in some ways. For example, dry custard powder is not potentially hazardous but when milk or water is mixed with the powder to make custard, the custard is potentially hazardous. Some foods may not be potentially hazardous but need refrigeration to stop them from spoiling. It is an offence to sell spoiled food. How can a business comply with the temperature control requirements? The simplest way to meet the requirements is to ensure that potentially hazardous food is received, stored, displayed or transported either very cold (5°C or colder) or very hot (60°C or hotter). Potentially hazardous food should also be cooled and reheated quickly and prepared in as short a time as possible. If for some reason you do not wish to, or are unable to store, display or transport food at 5°C or colder, or at 60°C or hotter, or meet the cooling and reheating time and temperature requirements, you must be able to show that you have a safe alternative system in place. The standard specifies the ways in which a food business can demonstrate to an enforcement officer that it is using a safe alternative system. You can use a food safety program, or follow recognised food industry guidelines, or use a system based on sound scientific evidence.

Chilled storage of foods Some foods need to be kept chilled to keep them Chilled storage of foods Some foods need to be kept chilled to keep them safe, for example food with a ‘use by’ date, food that you have cooked and won’t serve immediately, or other ready-to-eat food such as prepared salads. If these foods are not properly chilled, bacteria can grow and make people ill. What you need to do? aim to keep the coldest part of your fridge between 0 deg C and 5 deg C (32 deg F and 41 deg F) keep a fridge thermometer in the coldest part and check the temperature regularly keep the most perishable foods, like cooked meats, in the coldest part of the fridge return perishable foods to the fridge or freezer as soon as possible after use remember to keep raw food below ready-to-eat food in the fridge, or use separate fridges for raw and ready-to-eat food, if possible wrap or cover all raw or uncooked foods so that they can't touch or drip on other foods and contaminate them to keep the fridge cold, don't overload it or leave the door open longer than necessary don't put hot food in the fridge: let it cool first don't keep food beyond its "use by" date empty any part-used can into a bowl and cover it, otherwise the tin may contaminate the food follow storage instructions given on food packages

Role of Packaging in Market Development Function The true function of product packaging is Role of Packaging in Market Development Function The true function of product packaging is to protect the product during shipment from the manufacturer to the store selling it. Packaging is also a form of protection as the product sits on store shelves waiting for consumers to come along and purchase it. In marketing and market development, packaging is the “dress” on the product, which can play a role in whether the product sells in a new market or to new customers. Branding Product packaging also plays a vital role in the branding process of the product. Investor. Words defines a brand as a symbol, wording or another type of mark that differentiates a product or business from its competition, and branding is an essential part of marketing for many products and companies. Some products carry different branding, depending on the market in which they are sold, especially in different countries. Benefits Packaging can help sell the product because it provides space for sharing information about the product, such as nutritional information, usage or directions. For example, some packaging contains marketing messaging on the front to attract customers to pick it up and look at the product. In essence, the packaging can help to paint a picture of how the product benefits the customer. When developing a product in a new market, it is important to conduct market research, such as focus groups, to determine what is appealing to the new market. For example, preferences of colors, pictures and labels on products can differ from one country to another or from one group of customers to another. Features Packaging also can share information on the features of the product. Size, measurements, uses and more printed on the packaging of a product can help customers decide if the product fits their needs. For example, if a customer is shopping for an under-the-sink garbage can, he needs to know the measurements of a product to make sure it will fit under his sink. A package box or label that details the height, width and depth of a garbage can on a store shelf can help the customer quickly determine if it fits under his sink--ultimately helping him make the decision about whether to buy it.

Identification Packaging also can help customers identify the products or companies they are loyal Identification Packaging also can help customers identify the products or companies they are loyal to. For example, if a local restaurant decides it wants to sell its famous salad dressing in retail stores, the salad dressing packaging and label may carry the restaurant's logo, name and color scheme. Using packaging that carries the same brand helps customers of the restaurant identify the brand when shopping at the local grocery store. Once consumers start buying the product, packaging helps them quickly identify the product when shopping. When introducing a product in a new market, packaging can help to garner the attention of a prospect. For example, vibrant colors may prompt a new customer to stop and look at the product because of the bright colors or because the design is one she has seen before.

PACKAGİNG Packaging refers to the container or wrapper that holds a product or group PACKAGİNG Packaging refers to the container or wrapper that holds a product or group of products. Most commercial packaging serves two basic functions: protecting the product from damage during shipping, and promoting the product to the ultimate consumer. Some common types of packaging include shipping cartons, containers for industrial goods, and bags, boxes, cans, and other holders for consumer products. Packaging is of great importance to both sellers and buyers of products. It can prevent spoiling, breakage, tampering, or theft; enhance convenience in use or storage; and make products easier to identify. A significant improvement in packaging can even create a "new" product by expanding the ways in which it can be used, and thus its potential markets. For example, a soup that is packaged in a microwavable bowl might suddenly increase its sales to working people. Prior to World War II, packaging was used primarily to surround and protect products during storage, transportation, and distribution. Some packages were designed with aesthetic appeal and even for ease-of-use by the end consumer, but package design was typically left to technicians. After World War II, however, companies became more interested in marketing and promotion as a means of enticing customers to purchase their products. As a result, more manufacturers began to view packaging as an integral element of overall business marketing strategies to lure buyers.

PACKAGİNG This increased attention to packaging coincided with socioeconomic changes taking place around the PACKAGİNG This increased attention to packaging coincided with socioeconomic changes taking place around the world. As consumers became better educated and more affluent, their expectations of products—and their reliance on them—increased as well. Consequently, consumers began to rely much more heavily on manufactured goods and processed food items. New technologies related to production, distribution, and preservatives led to a massive proliferation in the number and type of products and brands available in industrialized nations. Thus, packaging became a vital means of differentiating items and informing inundated consumers. The importance of consumer packaging was elevated in the United States during the late 1970 s and 1980 s. Rapid post-war economic expansion and market growth waned during that period, forcing companies to focus increasingly on luring consumers to their product or brand at the expense of the competition. Package design became a marketing science. And, as a new corporate cost-consciousness developed in response to increased competition, companies began to alter packaging techniques as a way to cut production, storage, and distribution expenses.

PACKAGING STRATEGY One of the most critical roles for packaging is promoting products. Indeed, PACKAGING STRATEGY One of the most critical roles for packaging is promoting products. Indeed, just as ease-ofuse and readability are elements of the strategic packaging mix, packaging is an important part of a company's strategic marketing mix. Most packages for consumer products are designed for one of three purposes: 1) to improve the packaging of an existing product; 2) to add a new product to an existing product line; or 3) to contain an entirely new product. Redesign of packaging for existing products may be prompted by several factors. Many times, a company may simply want to breathe new life into a maturing product by updating its image or adding a new feature to the package, such as an easy-pour spout. Or, a company may redesign the package to respond to a competitive threat, such as a new product that is more visible on the shelf. Other strategic reasons for package redesign are: changes in the product; economics, which may require less or more expensive packaging; product line restructuring; alterations in market strategy, such as aiming the product at a different age group; trying to promote new uses for a product; or legal or environmental factors that lead to new materials or technology. Even small packaging changes for established brands and products typically require careful consideration, since a great deal of money is often at risk if a company alienates or confuses customers.

Packaging Types For Food Products In many states, especially in the South, food production Packaging Types For Food Products In many states, especially in the South, food production and manufacturing is one of the top industries driving the economy. The United States is a huge supplier of the world's food and as such spends a lot of time shipping food from state to state or country to country. As better and faster methods of shipping have developed, better and more secure packaging options have also become available. Because food must be protected from physical, chemical, and biological contact, the shipping of food products requires special attention. Most food packaging comes in specific standard packaging types. One of these is called aseptic processing. This type of packaging might be used to ship and store fruit juice, gravy, or liquid whole eggs. The goal of aseptic processing is to transport sterile foods in a sterile package that maintains the quality and sterility of the product. Plastic trays are another type of food packaging. This type of packaging is usually used to ship things like meat, poultry, and fish. You probably see them every time you go to the grocery store and walk past the meat section. The most common type of packaging is obviously a box. There are many different shapes and sizes from cereal boxes to boxes of soda to boxes of tissue. Cans are another very common type of packaging. Cans are great for food that will be stored for long periods of time because they are air tight and extremely protective. Flexible packaging, things like bagged salads and frozen vegetables, is another type of protective packaging

Packaging Types For Food Products Food packaging should have several important functions. First and Packaging Types For Food Products Food packaging should have several important functions. First and the most basic, it should physically protect the food from damage as a result of shock, vibration, or temperature. It should also employ a method for containment, especially if the product has several different kinds of small items within the primary packaging. Food packaging should also offer some kind of barrier protection from dust, water vapor, oxygen, or whatever it is designed for. If the product is designed for a long shelf life, the barrier protection should ensure that the contents can be stored for that period of time while still retaining their freshness and safety. Something that also retains safety should be any of the security features of the package. Most food products are designed with some type of tamper resistant or tamper-evident feature to inform consumers when a product has been opened or tampered with. The products that keep our food safe have been developed with careful research and trial and error. Thanks to these developments, you can rest assured that the food you bought at the store is safe.