BUDGET 101 Clinton Public Schools 2016 Budget

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BUDGET 101 Clinton Public Schools 2016 Budget BUDGET 101 Clinton Public Schools 2016 Budget

The Goal of the Chapter 70 Formula To ensure that every district has sufficient The Goal of the Chapter 70 Formula To ensure that every district has sufficient resources to meet its foundation budget spending level, through an equitable combination of local property taxes and state aid

Chapter 70 Aid is determined in three steps: 1. IT CALCULATES A FOUNDATION BUDGET Chapter 70 Aid is determined in three steps: 1. IT CALCULATES A FOUNDATION BUDGET (AN ADEQUATE FUNDING LEVEL FOR EACH DISTRICT) GIVEN THE SPECIFIC GRADES, PROGRAMS, AND DEMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS OF ITS STUDENTS 2. IT THEN DETERMINES AN EQUITABLE LOCAL CONTRIBUTION, HOW MUCH OF THAT “FOUNDATION BUDGET” SHOULD BE PAID FOR BY EACH CITY/TOWN’S PROPERTY TAX, BASED UPON THE RELATIVE WEALTH OF THE COMMUNITY 3. THE REMAINDER IS FUNDED BY CHAPTER 70 STATE AID Local contribution + State Aid = a district’s NET SCHOOL SPENDING (NSS) requirement. This is the MINIMUM amount that a district must spend in order to comply with state law

Net School Spending Requirement The Commonwealth’s school finance statute, Chapter 70 of the General Net School Spending Requirement The Commonwealth’s school finance statute, Chapter 70 of the General Laws, establishes an annual “net school spending” requirement for each Massachusetts’ school district. Failure to comply with this requirement may result in nonapproval of a municipality’s tax rate, enforcement action by the Attorney General, or loss of state aid. In the past three years, Clinton has funded its schools at 4. 5%, 4. 0%, and (this year) 6. 0% over that required amount.

Chapter 70 Trends – Clinton Public Schools Required Actual Local Foundation Pct Con. Chapter Chapter 70 Trends – Clinton Public Schools Required Actual Local Foundation Pct Con. Chapter 70 Pct Net School Spending Enrollment Chg Budget Chg tribution Aid Chg (NSS) Chg Spending FY 06 1, 990 -1. 4 15, 756, 067 3. 2 6, 894, 665 8, 894, 104 FY 07 2, 076 4. 3 17, 332, 016 10. 0 7, 423, 486 FY 08 2, 034 -2. 0 18, 272, 408 5. 4 7, 817, 673 FY 09 2, 051 0. 8 19, 345, 443 5. 9 8, 132, 725 FY 10 2, 018 -1. 6 19, 828, 375 2. 5 8, 774, 199 10, 988, 464 FY 11 2, 011 FY 12 Dollars Pct Chg Percent Over/Under Over/ Requirement Under 1. 1 15, 788, 769 3. 4 17, 877, 705 11. 7 2, 088, 936 13. 2 9, 908, 530 11. 4 17, 332, 016 9. 8 18, 641, 646 4. 3 1, 309, 630 7. 6 5. 5 18, 272, 408 5. 4 19, 764, 468 6. 0 1, 492, 060 8. 2 10, 033, 541 -4. 0 18, 166, 266 -0. 6 19, 455, 211 -1. 6 1, 288, 945 7. 1 9. 5 19, 762, 663 8. 8 19, 638, 072 0. 9 -124, 591 -0. 6 -0. 3 19, 382, 689 -2. 2 8, 971, 407 10, 408, 392 -5. 3 19, 379, 799 -1. 9 20, 276, 040 3. 2 896, 241 4. 6 1, 982 -1. 4 19, 545, 739 0. 8 9, 048, 453 10, 497, 286 0. 9 19, 545, 739 0. 9 20, 794, 529 2. 6 1, 248, 790 6. 4 FY 13 1, 976 -0. 3 20, 163, 527 3. 2 9, 343, 931 10, 857, 441 3. 4 20, 201, 372 3. 4 21, 105, 366 1. 5 903, 995 4. 5 FY 14 1, 985 0. 5 20, 693, 064 2. 6 9, 644, 943 11, 124, 662 2. 5 20, 769, 605 2. 8 21, 592, 589 2. 3 822, 984 4. 0 FY 15 1, 991 0. 3 20, 886, 486 0. 9 9, 674, 943 11, 251, 679 1. 1 20, 926, 622 0. 8 22, 175, 724* 2. 7 1, 249, 102 6. 0 10, 454, 735

TOWN CONTRIBUTIONS (%) OVER NET SCHOOL SPENDING State Average (FY 14) 15. 9% Clinton TOWN CONTRIBUTIONS (%) OVER NET SCHOOL SPENDING State Average (FY 14) 15. 9% Clinton 4. 0% Hudson 48. 2% Narragansett 16. 4% Berlin-Boylston 38. 3% Shrewsbury 10. 9% Harvard 37. 6% Wachusett 10. 2% Nashoba 34. 6% Quabbin 7. 5% Maynard 32. 3% Athol/Royalston 6. 2% 31. 2% Clinton 4. 0% Littleton Leominster 1. 4% West Boylston 30. 9% Gardner -0. 4% Marlborough 28. 0% Worcester -0. 7% Lunenburg 19. 1% Fitchburg -0. 9%

Commonwealth of Massachusetts State-wide Challenges Growth changes in High Risk Student Enrollments across the Commonwealth of Massachusetts State-wide Challenges Growth changes in High Risk Student Enrollments across the state: English-Language Learner: 33. 9% increase in five years Low-Income: 24. 8% increase in five years Student with Disabilities: -0. 6% (no real change in five years) First Language Not English: 15. 6% increase in five year Quote from state report: “The location of many high risk student populations are most concentrated in areas of the state where housing costs are relatively low and where a higher share of residents are low-income. So called “Gateway Cities” have been coined as a means of identifying these areas, which as a whole differ from many of their neighboring municipalities of greater fiscal capacity and social-cultural support. ”

TOWN OF CLINTON: COMMUNITY CHALLENGES Clinton, along with Athol, Gardner, and Leominster, report unemployment TOWN OF CLINTON: COMMUNITY CHALLENGES Clinton, along with Athol, Gardner, and Leominster, report unemployment rates considerably higher than the state average Poverty rates among families with a female head of household and related children is up 111% from 2000. Clinton residents 25 years and older without a high school diploma is 12. 1%, as opposed to 11. 3% in the state Clinton saw a 20% increase in the poverty level among families with children, more than doubling between 2000 and 2010 School grants are declining, which means local funds are required to pick up the slack School Choice numbers are decreasing and we use that money to fund salaries, technology, and teacher buy-backs

High Needs Population Clinton Public Schools State Average Low Income Students – 48. 2% High Needs Population Clinton Public Schools State Average Low Income Students – 48. 2% Low Income Students – 38. 3% Special Ed Students – 19. 6% Special Ed Students – 17. 0% ELL Students – 7. 7% ELL Students – 7. 9% ESL Students – 18. 8% ESL Students – 17. 3%

Per Pupil Costs: Clinton vs. State Per Pupil Expenditure Trends District and Massachusetts Average Per Pupil Costs: Clinton vs. State Per Pupil Expenditure Trends District and Massachusetts Average ----per pupil expenditure---MA Clinton average district FY 05 9, 838 10, 600 16, 000 FY 06 10, 078 11, 210 14, 000 FY 07 10, 720 11, 858 12, 000 FY 08 10, 838 12, 448 10, 000 FY 09 11, 129 13, 006 8, 000 FY 10 10, 967 13, 047 6, 000 FY 11 11, 739 13, 354 4, 000 FY 12 11, 273 13, 637 FY 13 11, 765 14, 021 FY 14 12, 094 14, 547 MA average 2, 000 0 FY 05 FY 06 FY 07 FY 08 FY 09 FY 10 FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 FY 14

School Choice: A Looming Problem What once was a “bottomless” pot of money that School Choice: A Looming Problem What once was a “bottomless” pot of money that funded various staff positions, technology updates, and teacher buy-backs, is now almost gone Where are our students going? Berlin-Boylston School District Nashoba Regional School District AMSA Charter School 30 students 52 students 46 students Of those coming in, where are they from? Fitchburg Leominster Lancaster Worcester 15 students 30 students 25 students 16 students

Notes On School Choice This year we are paying $962, 714 in salaries (14 Notes On School Choice This year we are paying $962, 714 in salaries (14 staff members) out of school choice money and (thus far) $92, 665 in technology expenses. Because of less choice students coming in, we will NOT be able to fund the salaries and expenses that we had done in the past. This means that these essential expenditures will have to be absorbed by the district’s general fund. It is important to note that as less money was put into the school’s budget, the school choice sending pupils increased—something we warned the public and town officials about for several years.

DECLINING BALANCES School Choice Account – 6/30/13 $679, 548. 97 School Choice Account – DECLINING BALANCES School Choice Account – 6/30/13 $679, 548. 97 School Choice Account – 6/30/14 $466, 579. 77 School Choice Account – 6/30/15 $156, 816. 10 (Estimated—with no further expenditures for remainder of the year)

Declining Allocation Grants IDEA (Special Education) down $14, 512 since 2012 SPED Program Improvement Declining Allocation Grants IDEA (Special Education) down $14, 512 since 2012 SPED Program Improvement down $7, 486 since 2012 Title IIA (Teacher Quality) down $3, 476 since 2012 Education Jobs (2012) $143, 969 (gone!) Race to the Top $183, 315 (gone!) Title I (based on poverty level) UP $82, 747 since 2012 Title III (based on ELL population) UP $817 since 2012 Kindergarten grant (funds K aides) $87, 400 (slated for elimination)

Teacher Retirements/Buy-back Any teacher hired before July 1, 2007 may buy back their unused Teacher Retirements/Buy-back Any teacher hired before July 1, 2007 may buy back their unused sick days according to a set formula. The maximum buy-back is set at $29, 000 and the school district has three years to pay out buyback monies. Traditionally, we’ve used school choice monies to do this, but can no longer do so. Last year, six teachers retired in June ($174, 000) and three more during THIS school year ($87, 000) – we were not able to pay any of them and it appears another 5 -6 will retire this coming year.

Latest Teacher Salary Schedule Steps Bachelor B+15 Masters M+15 M+50* PHD 1 $42, 125 Latest Teacher Salary Schedule Steps Bachelor B+15 Masters M+15 M+50* PHD 1 $42, 125 $43, 181 $44, 578 $45, 640 $49, 212 $50, 823 2 $43, 488 $44, 549 $45, 939 $47, 008 $50, 581 $54, 243 3 $47, 767 $48, 837 $50, 223 $51, 290 $54, 866 $57, 664 4 $51, 559 $52, 620 $54, 008 $55, 079 $58, 651 $61, 084 5 $55, 375 $56, 433 $57, 819 $58, 888 $62, 466 $64, 505 6 $60, 247 $61, 649 $62, 706 $66, 279 $67, 925 7 $64, 065 $65, 451 $66, 517 $70, 073 $71, 346 8 $69, 269 $70, 333 $73, 907 $74, 767 9 $71, 670 $72, 734 $76, 309 $78, 192 NOTES: Salaries represent 67% of our overall budget; funding STEPS ONLY next year equals a $167, 808 increase; a 1% raise for all teachers represents a $277, 913 increase; 58% of our teachers are on the top step right now.

New Positions Sought For 2015 -2016 ($326, 138) SPED: ABA KINDERGARTEN TEACHER SPED BEHAVIOR New Positions Sought For 2015 -2016 ($326, 138) SPED: ABA KINDERGARTEN TEACHER SPED BEHAVIOR SPECIALIST CHS: . 2 CHORUS TEACHER . 2 SOCIAL STUDIES TEACHER CMS: ONE FT MATH SUPPORT TEACHER (TITLE I) ONE FT WORLD LANGUAGE TEACHER CES: TWO TEACHERS (CLASS SIZE ISSUES)

Other Budget Considerations Less bus routes Increase pre-school tuition and athletic fees Request another Other Budget Considerations Less bus routes Increase pre-school tuition and athletic fees Request another technology/textbook warrant article Eliminate new staff requests Change collection procedures for various fees Drop virtual high school Neasc visiting team costs Eliminate all conferences Layoffs? Town-wide override?

911 BUDGET 101 Clinton Public Schools It’s Time For Action!! 911 BUDGET 101 Clinton Public Schools It’s Time For Action!!

Any Questions? ? Any Questions? ?




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