Скачать презентацию Bills to Laws Today s Goals Learning Скачать презентацию Bills to Laws Today s Goals Learning

8e8790da4dbd71ff392e3e8b421265ec.ppt

  • Количество слайдов: 21

Bills to Laws Bills to Laws

Today’s Goals • Learning Goals: – Students will be able to describe the functions Today’s Goals • Learning Goals: – Students will be able to describe the functions of the House of Commons and the Senate. – Students will be able to describe the functions of the executive, legislative and judicial branches of government. – Students will be able to explain how bills become laws. – Students will create a proposed bill to make a change to existing laws in relation to their issue of Civic concern. • Success Criteria – I can describe the functions of the House of Commons and the Senate. – I can identify the functions of the executive, legislative and judicial branches of government – I can explain how a bill becomes a law

Branches of Government • Executive – Includes symbolic, political and permanent members. These individuals Branches of Government • Executive – Includes symbolic, political and permanent members. These individuals are responsible for suggesting, implementing and ruling by new laws. • This branch of government rules according to the laws. • Legislative - The power to discuss, amend and pass laws. The only limit on this power is that the laws must fall within their jurisdiction (as outlined by the Constitution). • This branch of government makes the laws. • Judicial - To determine if a law has been broken and to impose punishment. They are often asked to determine the validity of laws. • This branch of government enforces the laws.

Who are the people who impact our laws? Who are the people who impact our laws?

FAQs • Complete the worksheet on frequently asked questions about the House of Commons FAQs • Complete the worksheet on frequently asked questions about the House of Commons and the Senate. • Students will be given the worksheet questions to fill out. – Each group will be given a package of information and they have to work together to come up with the answers and fill in their chart

What Are Some Things The House of Commons and the Senate Do? What Are Some Things The House of Commons and the Senate Do?

They create bills which go through a process to become our laws They create bills which go through a process to become our laws

What is a Bill? • A draft of a proposed law presented to parliament What is a Bill? • A draft of a proposed law presented to parliament for discussion. • Public Bills – Proposals for laws that will affect the public in general. • Private Bills – Concern an individual or a group of individuals only.

How a Bill Becomes a Law How a Bill Becomes a Law

The Government, an individual Member of Parliament (MP) or a Senator comes up with The Government, an individual Member of Parliament (MP) or a Senator comes up with the idea for a new law. Once that idea is described in a written document, it is called a bill.

In this case, the bill is introduced in the House of Commons. (Although less In this case, the bill is introduced in the House of Commons. (Although less common, a Senator can also introduce a bill in the Senate, as long as it is not about taxes or spending money. ) The First Reading of the bill takes place at the same time as the introduction.

The bill gets a Second Reading in the House of Commons, during which MPs The bill gets a Second Reading in the House of Commons, during which MPs from all parties debate its strengths and weaknesses. This debate ends with a vote on the principle of the bill. If the bill passes Second Reading—meaning the vote ends in favour of the bill—a committee examines it in detail, clause by clause, and decides whether any changes should be made. These changes are called amendments.

The chairperson of the committee reports the bill to the House with any amendments The chairperson of the committee reports the bill to the House with any amendments that may have been made. Individual MPs can also propose their own amendments. This stage ends with a debate on any additional amendments.

After all amendments have been passed or rejected, the bill goes to Third Reading. After all amendments have been passed or rejected, the bill goes to Third Reading. During Third Reading, MPs debate the final form of the bill and vote to decide whether or not the House should pass it.

After the bill passes Third Reading it is considered passed by the House. The After the bill passes Third Reading it is considered passed by the House. The Bill then moves to the Senate.

In the Senate the bill receives a new First Reading. Just as in the In the Senate the bill receives a new First Reading. Just as in the House of Commons, when the bill gets a Second Reading in the Senate, Senators debate its strengths and weaknesses and vote on the principle of the bill.

After the bill passes Second Reading, it is examined clause by a committee of After the bill passes Second Reading, it is examined clause by a committee of the Senate. The committee decides whether any changes (amendments) should be made. The chairperson of the committee reports the bill to the Senate with any amendments, and individual Senators propose their own amendments if they wish. Senators then debate all amendments that have been suggested.

The bill is then passed by the Senate (If amendments have been made, the The bill is then passed by the Senate (If amendments have been made, the other chamber must agree to any amendments to the bill, and messages may go back and forth until agreement is reached). After all amendments have been passed or rejected in debate, the bill goes to Third Reading in the Senate. During Third Reading, Senators debate the final form of the bill and vote to decide if it should be passed.

Once the House of Commons and the Senate pass the bill in exactly the Once the House of Commons and the Senate pass the bill in exactly the same wording, it goes to the Governor General or a representative of the Governor General for approval. The Governor General or a representative of the Governor General gives the bill Royal Assent and it can then become a law.

How a Law is Made Video How a Law is Made Video

Activity • Students will be divided into 6 groups of 4/5 each. – 3 Activity • Students will be divided into 6 groups of 4/5 each. – 3 groups will be House of Commons representatives. – 3 groups will be Senate representatives • In your group of 4/5 you need to vote on something you would like to change (school related) • Discuss and revise your idea into a Bill • Switch with an opposite group (House of Commons or Senate) • The Bill must receive their approval as well, before it can be sent for singing (Royal Assent) – The other group may suggest revisions to your Bill before it can be approved.